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Published Book or Work by:

Lee Pletzers

Re-Entry of Evil

Re-Entry of Evil
Buy this book
Published by SPX Press
ISBN: 1-932672-13-3

There are 2 versions available. One at Lulu and the worldwide edition. Dues to shipping and out of stock complaints regarding Amazon and Barnes and Noble, a new edition was released with a new "darker" cover. Full deatils on site.

BLURB:
Mephistopheles has offered Peter a book, a book that will bring his wildest wishes to reality. The price? Just a little blood. 20 years later, it is time to give his soul to the dark lord, but Peter wants to return and he's just found a loophole to make that possible.

He returns in the year 2368, just as the Arabian/German Front is building up to the forth world war. Christianity is almost non-existent, and Peter will bring forth his Lord, his Master, The Dark One. The timing couldn't have been better.

More Information...
Gothic , Horror , Occult , Suspense
 
2 comments You must be logged in to add a comment
From: Lee Pletzers (author@leepletzers.com) 2004-12-08

Review of Re-Entry of Evil by Nicholas Grabowsky When Iíd first approached the task of reading this book I held virtually no presuppositions. Though Richard Lee has experience in writing and editing horror fiction over the years, is a prominent contributor for Sinisteria Magazine and achieved a degree of acclaim for his novels Blood of the Wolf and Nightmare, he has yet at the time of penning this review to step into the limelight of genre notoriety beyond the arena of self-publishing. On the other hand, for him, it is a grand arena. In this particular genre, Lee has managed to have made such a name for himself that among the literal thousands of writers that share his walk down the same road to get their works noticed and read and sold, it is nearly impossible to avoid hearing about him. His ambition and devotion to his craft is evident even in this fact alone. Re-Entry of Evil centers primarily around the character of Peter Clement, and upon his introduction in the book as the proprietor of a family hand-me-down antiques shop, the last thing the reader would suspect about him was just how devastatingly evil heíd turn out to be. A patron steps into his shop, aptly calling himself the ĎMeph-man,í who introduces him to the Devilís Wish Book, a book of pure badness which had been collecting dust among the antiques unbeknownst to Peter. A short series of events involving a little blood and ritualistic mayhem commit him to the dark apocalyptic powers of the book which turn him into a sadistic killer, until he finds himself entrapped within the same instrument of death he found himself using to kill his victims: a magical dagger. The tale takes a leap in time to the twenty-third century, where Peter is unleashed from the dagger to a future world where technology has advanced, convenience is sweeter, drugs are deadlier, weíve had a hostile encounter with aliens and the earth is governed by a single president. Not to mention, the world is on the brink of war instigated by a regime known as the German/Arabian Front. Whatís more, there is a subculture of devotees who are aware of the dark Wish Book and of the coming of the Devil himself, personified in Peter, as well as an array of protagonists bent on thwarting evilís horrific plans. There is little doubt that Re-Entry was written with great vision and diligence by a remarkable writer who will go far as long as he continues down this path. At times, though take note times few and far between, I found a mild mediocrity in Leeís narrative that deserved to have been polished and perfected. But mind you, Iím talking about potential genius here; these things are forgiven with the overall delivery of a fiendishly clever tale, and I was particularly floored by the impressive literature that graced my eyes when Lee lapsed into first person after a professor discovers Peterís diaries. In time, Iím certain we all will witness just what an amazing literary talent Richard Lee is. Letís hope he keeps it up. Iím looking forward to more.

From: Lee Pletzers (author@leepletzers.com) 2004-12-08

Review of Re-Entry of Evil by Nicholas Grabowsky When Iíd first approached the task of reading this book I held virtually no presuppositions. Though Richard Lee has experience in writing and editing horror fiction over the years, is a prominent contributor for Sinisteria Magazine and achieved a degree of acclaim for his novels Blood of the Wolf and Nightmare, he has yet at the time of penning this review to step into the limelight of genre notoriety beyond the arena of self-publishing. On the other hand, for him, it is a grand arena. In this particular genre, Lee has managed to have made such a name for himself that among the literal thousands of writers that share his walk down the same road to get their works noticed and read and sold, it is nearly impossible to avoid hearing about him. His ambition and devotion to his craft is evident even in this fact alone. Re-Entry of Evil centers primarily around the character of Peter Clement, and upon his introduction in the book as the proprietor of a family hand-me-down antiques shop, the last thing the reader would suspect about him was just how devastatingly evil heíd turn out to be. A patron steps into his shop, aptly calling himself the ĎMeph-man,í who introduces him to the Devilís Wish Book, a book of pure badness which had been collecting dust among the antiques unbeknownst to Peter. A short series of events involving a little blood and ritualistic mayhem commit him to the dark apocalyptic powers of the book which turn him into a sadistic killer, until he finds himself entrapped within the same instrument of death he found himself using to kill his victims: a magical dagger. The tale takes a leap in time to the twenty-third century, where Peter is unleashed from the dagger to a future world where technology has advanced, convenience is sweeter, drugs are deadlier, weíve had a hostile encounter with aliens and the earth is governed by a single president. Not to mention, the world is on the brink of war instigated by a regime known as the German/Arabian Front. Whatís more, there is a subculture of devotees who are aware of the dark Wish Book and of the coming of the Devil himself, personified in Peter, as well as an array of protagonists bent on thwarting evilís horrific plans. There is little doubt that Re-Entry was written with great vision and diligence by a remarkable writer who will go far as long as he continues down this path. At times, though take note times few and far between, I found a mild mediocrity in Leeís narrative that deserved to have been polished and perfected. But mind you, Iím talking about potential genius here; these things are forgiven with the overall delivery of a fiendishly clever tale, and I was particularly floored by the impressive literature that graced my eyes when Lee lapsed into first person after a professor discovers Peterís diaries. In time, Iím certain we all will witness just what an amazing literary talent Richard Lee is. Letís hope he keeps it up. Iím looking forward to more.