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Stephanie Vermeulen

Agent: None

Johannesburg, South Africa

Email: steph@eqsa.co.za

Home page: www.eqsa.co.za

Steph Vermeulen is South Africa's leading expert on Emotional Intelligence and the country’s most controversial voice on women’s issues.

As the first person to introduce emotional intelligence to the African continent, she has spent the past 10 years debunking the theory to make it practical.

Her first book - "EQ: Emotional Intelligence for Everyone" – is a best-seller and her second - "Stitched up: Who fashions women’s lives?" – was launched in South Africa in 2005. In 2007 this book was published in the USA under the title: "Kill the Princess: Why women still aren’t free from the quest for a fairytale life".

Steph writes for many popular magazines on various topics and has had many articles published in O Magazine, Elle, Succeed Magazine and the Mail & Guardian as well as writing a regular controversial column for Longevity. She is also frequently interviewed about numerous issues on television and radio.

In 2001 she became so fed up with the negativity in South Africa that she launched the country’s first National Be Positive Day, which now runs as an annual event.

Steph has been a popular speaker on the circuit for some fifteen years. She has been invited to address audiences at international conferences and has developed a reputation for ‘pulling no punches’.

For more information please go to: www.stephanievermeulen.com.
Also see clips of Steph in action on YouTube.

Interests: Walking (climbed Kilimanjaro in 2006), Cycling (four marathons under her belt), Reading, Fine Food & Wine, Humour and lots of Good Conversation.

Published writer: Yes

Freelance: Yes

 

Published works:

Nonfiction

  • EQ: Emotional Intelligence for Everyone
  • Stitched-up: Who Fashions Women's Lives?
  • Kill the Princess: Why Women Still Aren't Free from the Quest for a Fairytale Life