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Jo Jones

Randolph, New Jersey, United States

Ten years ago, I focused my artistic energies on nonfiction. I believed that the sole mediums capable of rendering accurate reflections of life were documentaries, news stories, and research articles. However, while I whittled down my raw material for clarity and conciseness, I inevitably sculpted the stories to reflect my point of view.

Knowing what I would edit, I became more selective as I gathered information. My life experiences dictated where I chose to point my camera, who I sought to interview, and what I decided to include in my notes. The end product I created was not the pure reflection of life that I hoped it would be. Instead, I offered a glimpse of my own reality through a mirror that was glazed and cut by my hands.

The distinction between fact and fiction is a line of chalk drawn on a city sidewalk. The interaction among subject, audience, and narrator are the footprints that erode the faint demarcation. I no longer believe that absolute truths exist in relation to one's perception of events.

I came to the world of screenplays, novels, and children's fiction in search of a new truth. I explore the innermost secrets in the minds of my characters. Viewing the world through their eyes, I see a reality different from my own.

Today, I feel comfortable writing in any genre. My exploration of fiction has broadened my outlook. I live beyond the limits of my peripheral vision and discover truths about life that I couldn’t acknowledge before. The microscope I place my characters under is a mirror that reflects facets of myself and the world around me.

Interests: Screenplays, Mainstream Fiction, and Children's Books.

Published writer: Yes

Freelance: Yes

 

Published works:

Fiction

  • The Funeral Pyre
  • Other

  • "Natural" Doesn't Always Mean "Easy"
  • "Natural" Doesn't Always Mean "Easy"