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Nathan Elbert

Agent: none (as yet)
1604 E. Walnut St., Apt. #1
Des Plaines, Illinois, United States

Email: marksjacobs@worldnet.att.net

AOL: Oosar Em Elvenon

At the age of 12 his IQ was measured to be 196.
At the age of 17 he wrote a story on the TWA flight 800 incident which was said to be one of the best short stories ever written, called good enough for Time Magazine, and referred to as, "heartfelt", "wonderful", and "one of the most touching things I have ever read".
He has taken professional singing, acting, and even modeling classes. As a depressed extrovert with parents who wanted him to become a "nerd" of Harvard-graduate status and a soul longing for the youthful innocence of Colorado and a time when he was free, he has been able to capture emotion in words well enough to literally bring tears to the eyes of his readers.
He has been called "the artist" by friends and family because his work extends beyond writing into many another realm.
Yet it's in writing, where his high school English teachers specially requested to have him in their classes after he snuck 3 poems and 2 short stories into the school's literary magazine, and where his poems were said to "bring me back" to youthful times by an older man, and where his poems have been published in the bulletins of such esteemed institutions as "the High IQ society" Mensa, he has succeeded in ways beyond his other arts.
A social worker who was once an English teacher told him he'd have "no trouble getting published" and...

...despite all of this, he tries to remain humble and human. Such is the intimate yet comforting emotion of his work. His name by birth is Mark Jacobs, but all his work is done as Nathan Elbert. He talks of himself in the third person mostly because he dislikes the arrogance of "I", "I", "I"...

With near-death experiences involving flying off bridges in speeding vans (into rivers nonetheless), and near-dream experiences like going to Alaska by himself for eight days at the age of 16, his emotional mind has evolved to a point where it can, in combination with his "giftedness", present feelings in ways never felt before.

He has written an autobiography in the third person, which for a 17-year-old teenage male who is virgin, has never done drugs, alcohol, or tobacco, and promotes morality, humility, and generosity over sex and rock'n'roll, is something entirely unique. The book is about as long as Moby Dick, but not for boredom's sake. Each chapter's experiences are translated into lessons or things which might prove useful in general, and by the end of the book a psychology student wouldn't need a psychology class anymore. It is the first installment of the autobiography, called "Before Fame" as it, unlike most, is written of a 'normal' person in a 'normal' situation, yet still with so much to learn. With a sequel autobiography of later years and another of even-later years thereafter, he hopes to eventually create one of the, if not THE, single most comprehensive self-diagnostic study of a human life ever written.
He has also compiled hundreds of his poems and dozens of his short stories into a massive anthology which, with a few poems from friends, provides a unique insight into teenage writing.
Nathan writes Sci-Fi, Fantasy, and his own style which he calls Sci-Filosophy which takes your space ships and hovercraft and teaches something from them. He also writes poems, songs, screenplays, short stories, long stories, stories of lengths to-be-announced, and EMails long enough that his friends call them 'novelmails'.

And if all that ain't good enough for yall, he's designed himself a jetliner using professional CAD software, written 32 or thereabouts songs, recorded a few of 'em, and drawn some pretty darn nifty lookin' drawings.

Because he writes for the sake of writing and NOT for the sake of paying bills, Nathan offers any agent twice whatever percentage they usually take from an author's return. If you usually want 20% of what an author makes, take 40... if it's usually 33, take 66...

The TWA article, published on the world's largest aviation website, can be found at http://www.airliners.net/articles/read.main?id=2
Be sure and read the responses posted by users if you do read the article.

and Thank you,

I appreciate it.

Yeah... I




giving is living

Interests: Go find a dictionary and look up anything that's not too decedent, deceitful, dumb, or drear and everything that's good, glad, jolly, or jovial...

Published writer: Yes

Freelance: Yes

 

Published works:

Nonfiction

  • Thank You