HomeWritersLiterary AgentsEditorsPublishersResourcesDiscussion
Forum Login | Join the discussion
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 6 1 2 3 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 56
  1. #1
    Joe D Sr.
    Guest

    Published or not??

    ok here is the deal. I supposedly have like 4 or 5 poems published by Poetry.com and they have supposedly sold my poems within their books so would that qualify as Published it does say Copyright but I definetly have no agent?? Also could I put those poems on this even though they are already published?? if someone could plz help me out would appreciate it alot :-)



  2. #2
    Kevin Craig
    Guest

    Re: Published or not??

    Poetry.com is the biggest scam going. STAY AWAY from them!

  3. #3
    Joe D Sr.
    Guest

    Re: Published or not??

    hey Kevin,

    Y are they the biggest scam?? I think Noble House Publishing is WAY worse. :-)

  4. #4
    Kevin Craig
    Guest

    Re: Published or not??

    Well, there are a lot of scams out there...true. Just beware that poetry.com publishes everybody and then tries to get them to buy their books at 50.00 a pop. It's a scam...one I heard about long before I even began to submit. It's widely known to stay away from them. Noble House may be the same, I don't know...I just pick carefully before I do any submitting. I would consider the poems unpublished if I were you...don't even think about using those publications in your bio. It would probably be a strike against you. Not trying to be unhelpful, just repeating what I heard through so many warning sources.

  5. #5
    Amanda Roper
    Guest

    Re: Published or not??

    I'd have to say the "Famous Poet" poetry contest is about the same. Their book price is a bit more reasonable at $25. Still, if you want a chance at the "big prizes," you have to spend $450 or more and go to their convention. I made the mistake of entering several years ago, before I knew anything about the publishing industry. They're still sending me junk, trying to get me to enter again.

    -> They did send me a lovely (cough, cough) tote bag though.

  6. #6
    Karen Dionne
    Guest

    Re: Published or not??

    Joe -

    I read your bio; if you're asking if you can put your poems on your profile page here or check the box calling yourself a "published author" because they're in poetry.com's anthology, I say, sure - why not? The definition of "published" here is actually fairly broad, ranging from authors who've self-published, to those whose work has been placed in literary journals without monetary compensation (that's me!), to those who've been picked up by smaller publishers, to those whose books have been sold for mega-thousands of dollars to the big guys in New York.

    I think Kevin may have made the same mistake I have in the past, and that's judging another writer by my own writing goals. It took me a while to catch on that not every writer hopes to get their work published at a major publishing house like I do. If your goal in writing is to reach people with your poems, and perhaps make the world a better place as a result (as you say on your profile page), and you're happy to have your work in poetry.com's anthology, then I think that writing goal is every bit as legitimate as mine.

    BTW - calling poetry.com and others like it a scam isn't quite accurate. It's true they accept nearly every poem that's submitted to them in the hope that submitters will buy their book and other perks, and it's true that submitters who think this publication will lead to bigger and better things are mistaken, but these companies deliver what they promise, which is why the law allows them to continue to operate.

    Good luck with your writing -

    Karen

  7. #7
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    Re: Published or not??

    Yes, you technically are published--but you are very badly published. Poetry.com (and other schemes like it) are willing to print everything they receive. But, as they have "selected" your poems and themselves paid to print them and offer the book for sale, you technically are published.

    Agents and publishers don't just look for the word "published" in projecting the skill and marketability of writers who submit work to them, however. They look for signs of competitive selection and reputable publishers behind the submitters. Poetry.com (and other schemes like it) have such a bad reputation that mentioning in a query letter that you have been published by them will most likely move you into the "negative" published column of agents and publishers. They'll just think you are naive and unprofessional and gave your poems to this scheme because you couldn't sell them to a legitimate publisher.

    Agents/publishers also will no longer be interested in the specific poems you published with Poetry.com. They will consider these published already--unless you subsequently become quite famous and publishers are scrambling around to reprint works from your early years.

    As far as whether or not you can republish those poems yourself, you need to carefully look at whatever contract words exist in your communications with Poetry.com. Someone who would be uninformed enough to publish with Poetry.com in the first place probably will not have paid much attention to whether/what rights they have formally transferred to Poetry.com in the process. The rights to your poem may (or may not) be wholly assigned to Poetry.com now.

  8. #8
    Anonymous
    Guest

    Re: Published or not??

    Karen, did I read that right, and see that you are unpublished? WHOA! The Empress of Query Letters Extraordinaire? I just can't believe that. If there is one person on here who has my utmost respect and whose advice I've taken very seriously to heart, that's you.

    WHAT ARE THOSE PUBLISHERS THINKING??? Shame on them!

    And that also has me thinking, if KAREN can't get published when she seems so all together and of the highest caliber, then what the heck are my chances for publishing, little Miss Wannabee that I am?

    Is it too early for a tequila shot?

  9. #9
    Karen Dionne
    Guest

    For anonymous

    LOL, Anonymous! Thanks for the nice words. I guess my situation just shows that a person learns a lot on the road to publication, is all. You'll notice that when I offer comments based on my experience, they always stop short of what happens after publication. One day, perhaps, I'll have something to say on that subject as well. :-)

    I like to think I'll hit it with one of the big guys eventually. My agent submitted my first novel to 16 houses last fall, and we heard back from just 7 - all nos. The editor's comments ranged from "I read this clever and entertaining manuscript from first page to last" to "the writing and dialogue needed to be much stronger, and the overall storyline more focused and compelling." Ouch! Anyway, I reworked the manuscript this spring taking some of the rejecting editors' comments into account, and my agent's going to send the manuscript to a few more houses this fall. Meanwhile, he's already agreed to rep my next novel, a thriller set in Antarctica, which I hope to have ready for submission by the first of the year, so I've got no complaints.

    But I am published! At my agent's suggestion, last fall I started submitting some of my short stories to literary journals to try to pick up a few publishing credits with which to impress the editors, and I've since placed three stories: two of my humorous short stories are currently appearing in three different literary journals: Bathtub Gin, The Adirondack Review (www.adirondackreview.org - click on "Current Issue" and scroll down to fiction, if you're curious), and Thought Magazine, where my story was recently awarded First Place (!) in Thought's Spring 2003 Writing Contest. (I still can't get over that one!) Another story, a mystery, is appearing in the Fall 2003 issue of Futures Mysterious Anthology Magazine, and I actually got paid for that one - a whole $10 - so I figure technically, I've gone pro. :-)

    It's tough to break in at the major publishers, without a doubt. At that level, competition is fierce! But I think two big factors in ultimately doing so is the determination to always improve in your writing, and to never to give up.

    Good luck with your writing!

    Karen, your fellow wannabee.

  10. #10
    Anonymous
    Guest

    Re: For anonymous

    Yes, but you are different in that you HAVE an agent, whereas I'm trying to get an agent to give me the time of day....

    I still bow to your worthiness...

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts