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  1. #1
    danilo smajich
    Guest

    "experimental fiction"????

    Hi all -
    Got a strange E-mail from a new writer, who stated he was going to do "experimental fiction".
    Anybody ever heard of, or written such? If so, explain.
    Thanx,

    ...danilo...



  2. #2
    Charlie "Boog" Hayes
    Guest

    Re: "experimental fiction"????

    Danilo,

    I think "experimental fiction" may be about a male lesbian alien, science fiction mystery, thriller, cookbook. Haven't you heard, they are the rage right now!!! Boog

  3. #3
    Irene Rheinwald
    Guest

    Re: \ experimental fiction

    Danilo and Charlie: go to the \'Writing Craft\' forum, scroll back a few pages, and you\'ll find a long discussion on experimental fiction (dated December 9 to 13). This type of fiction is indeed complex, difficult to define, yet quite fascinating. I hope this helps.

    Many regards, Irene.

  4. #4
    danilo smajich
    Guest

    Re: \ experimental fiction

    "Boog" -
    All I can do is l a u g h at that one!
    What a good answer:Unique, I must say!
    Anyway, wouldn't that somehow fall into the category of
    "depraved universal cuisine" or something?

    ...danilo...

  5. #5
    danilo smajich
    Guest

    Re: \ experimental fiction

    Irene -
    Thank you for the response. It should be interesting and
    probably challenging to associate that style to some
    writing. I'm wondering how it originated, by whom, when.
    If the discussion doesn't provide that information, perhaps somebody on this site knows.???
    Anyway, thanx again,

    ...danilo...

  6. #6
    Ben Rose
    Guest

    Re: \ experimental fiction

    Hey danilo, what's with the artsy fartsy posting?

  7. #7
    Victor Miller
    Guest

    Re: \ experimental fiction

    Back in the days of movable type Science Fiction was also labled as Experimaental Fiction. I can't be sure what is meant by it today other than some piece of prose that doesn't fit neatly into a current genre.

    Victor

  8. #8
    Irene Rheinwald
    Guest

    Re: \ experimental fiction

    Yes, that was quite the discussion! Danilo: experimental fiction, although a recent term, did not start as the brainchild of one author in a particular time; it is not a genre per se. Rather, one must consider experimentalism as reactionary - ie, removed from established norms, and thus, innovative: a new approach to the act of writing, irrespective of subject or genre. However, even this must be qualified: a new genre (ie, idea) might also be considered experimental; that is where the first science fiction novel fits (Wells, Verne). Usually, it's how, not what (refer to the examples Steve and I gave). Subject is secondary in relation to how the author presents his/her material, particularly today - more an issue of how one utilizes the tools of language as a modality of expression. Any author, in any age, might be considered experimental if adopting a different style of presentation than his/her contemporaries. Literary history is rife with innovation: even the novel, at one point, was considered new. I remember reading eighteenth century English critics who denounced the novel as a fad which would die an ignoble, unlamented death - sooner rather than later. Hmm. The first poem ever written was experimental. The first play. The first epic. The first piece of fiction. The first author who toyed with words, sentences, ideas and/or presented them in a new form, however outrageous and unfamiliar. How far back might one go? To when man first carved letters upon cave walls or stone tablets. Indeed, it is man's nature to push boundaries - whether in the visual arts, science, philosophy, or writing, since time immemorial.

    One thing I guarantee: once others jump on the experimental bandwagon en masse, it is no longer so. Who today considers the novel as experimental?

    Sorry if this clouded the issue. Think of the word 'experiment' and we have the gist.

  9. #9
    Irene Rheinwald
    Guest

    Re: \ experimental fiction

    Yes, that was quite the discussion! Danilo: experimental fiction, although a recent term, did not start as the brainchild of one author in a particular time; it is not a genre per se. Rather, one must consider experimentalism as reactionary - ie, removed from established norms, and thus, innovative: a new approach to the act of writing, irrespective of subject or genre. However, even this must be qualified: a new genre (ie, idea) might also be considered experimental; that is where the first science fiction novel fits (Wells, Verne). Usually, it's how, not what (refer to the examples Steve and I gave). Subject is secondary in relation to how the author presents his/her material, particularly today - more an issue of how one utilizes the tools of language as a modality of expression. Any author, in any age, might be considered experimental if adopting a different style of presentation than his/her contemporaries. Literary history is rife with innovation: even the novel, at one point, was considered new. I remember reading eighteenth century English critics who denounced the novel as a fad which would die an ignoble, unlamented death - sooner rather than later. Hmm. The first poem ever written was experimental. The first play. The first epic. The first piece of fiction. The first author who toyed with words, sentences, ideas and/or presented them in a new form, however outrageous and unfamiliar. How far back might one go? To when man first carved letters upon cave walls or stone tablets. Indeed, it is man's nature to push boundaries - whether in the visual arts, science, philosophy, or writing, since time immemorial.

    One thing I guarantee: once others jump on the experimental bandwagon en masse, it is no longer so. Who today considers the novel as experimental?

    Sorry if this clouded the issue. Think of the word 'experiment' and we have the gist.

  10. #10
    Irene Rheinwald
    Guest

    Re: \ experimental fiction

    Still having trouble posting! Sorry for the repeat.

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