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  1. #1
    Stacy Copping
    Guest

    how many query letters should I send?

    I have finished my manuscript and have begun the process of submitting query letters. This is my first time and I almost feel like a young teen on her first date. How many query letters should I send? I sent fifteen on the first day and received one request to read my book. Is this typical? How long will the agent take to read my eighty-nine thousand page novel? Should I take a breath, sit back, and wait? Should I continue to query other agents? Should I go to second base? Ha Ha.



  2. #2
    Keith .
    Guest

    Re: how many query letters should I send?

    How long will the agent take to read my eighty-nine thousand page novel?

    Just relax. You have time to raise a family, explore remote galaxies, invent alternative fuels, solve the Mideast conflict, discover Bill Clinton's morals and George W. Bush's brain. 89,000 pages! Holy crap, Amazon's shipping charges will be enormous!
    km


    j/k

  3. #3
    Stacy Copping
    Guest

    Re: how many query letters should I send?

    oops! Did I say 89,000 pages? I meant words! 89,000 words! I don't think I could write 89 thou pages in a lifetime. Although I'd probably have a much better shot at writing 89,000 page high quality novel than finding George W. Bush's brain. Does an empty peanut shell count?

    Is it a good sign that one agent requested the manuscript? I'm going through the process a little backwards. I already have the family and now they expect to eat.

  4. #4
    Matt Austin
    Guest

    Re: how many query letters should I send?

    I plan on sending to 10 agents at a time. If I don't hear anything within 2 months, I'll send to 10 more. If you've already had a reply I'd say you're off to a good start!
    Good luck!

  5. #5
    Sapphire Savvy
    Guest

    Re: how many query letters should I send?

    10 per two months is WAY too slow, sorry, IMHO. I think your rate is pretty good, Stacy.

  6. #6
    Stacy Copping
    Guest

    Re: how many query letters should I send?

    Thanks. What genre is your ms? Mine is juvenile fiction. I tried and failed to find something on the bookshelves with the power to inspire my children to turn off their game boys. Finally, I wrote the story for them. It worked! I spent many days writing and they spent two days reading. Now they want another.

  7. #7
    Matt Austin
    Guest

    Re: how many query letters should I send?

    Okay, I'll double it to twenty! I've written a youth fantasy book. You can read the query in lierary agents section (any feedback would be great!)
    What's your book about? Have you posted your query for feedback?

  8. #8
    Matt Austin
    Guest

    Re: how many query letters should I send?

    By the way, you'll have to write a REALLY good book to get the kids off the gameboys. Mine are hooked on the Wii, so I know where you're coming from!!

  9. #9
    Stacy Copping
    Guest

    Re: how many query letters should I send?

    Matt, How did your kids like your story? I think mine would like the novel you describe in your query letter. It has all the creepy stuff they love.

    I have only one critism (and I am brand new at this). On most of the websites I've visited to research this whole process, a criteria is provided for queries. It is mentioned more than once that a nongeneric greeting is preferred. Rather than "Dear Editor" or "Dear Agent", they want to see Dear Ms. ***** or Dear Mr. *****. If I'm wrong, please people, tell me so. I've personalized all my query letters to focus on the agent I have googled and targeted. I actually wrote fifteen different versions. This is the one that inspired a request for a look at my novel.

    Ok, Here's my query letter:

    Dear Ms. ******,

    I would like this opportunity to tell you that as a mother of three boys I have found a void on the bookshelves. I have hunted for a good novel for my young teens to read that captures their interest and pulls them away from their game boys. I failed. My children have told me that if I can find a "tight" adventure book, they would read it. I have written this novel for them. I have asked each boy to only read one page and they read the entire book. They expressed such eagerness for another I feel compelled to share.

    Win White is an artistic thirteen year old boy living a small, southern town. Rejected by his peers, he spends the majority of his time at home with his younger sister and grandmother, who reluctantly assumed full custody when the children's mother became a permanent resident of Georgia prison system. Edwin, as he is called by his grandmother and teachers, becomes more and more fearful as summer storms ravage soothing skies and his grandmother's beatings become more and more frequent. Convinced that a dark creature will sail to his humble abode within the cloak of thunder clouds, he risks waking his grandmother and takes refuge only a few feet from her to sit by his sister's side in front of their television. His grandmother is awakened and violently banishes him to his room. Later that night, Win finds himself in the clutches of his worst nightmare, the dark dragon. He fearfully hangs on as the massive beast glides through the night sky only to land outside his bedroom window where he exhales a stream of fire igniting the boy's home. Win awakens to find his bedroom consumed by flames. In the following days, as he lay in a hospital bed, he ventures to another world where he befriends a kindly dragon, seeks hidden treasure, battles giant spiders, and saves an entire colony of strange beings. Through his adventures, he finds the inner strength needed to face his real world and the reality of his circumstance. He realizes that his grandmother, in a drug haze, accidentally set the fire. He tricks her into reporting herself for drug abuse and changes his family's life for the better.

    DragonWin is an 89,600 word, juvenile fiction novel.

    Thank you,

    Stacy Copping
    more info given

  10. #10
    Sapphire Savvy
    Guest

    Re: how many query letters should I send?

    What genre is your ms?

    Were you asking me? I wasn't sure. I write historical ficiton.

    Good luck with your submissions!

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