HomeWritersLiterary AgentsEditorsPublishersResourcesDiscussion
Forum Login | Join the discussion
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: I get it now!

  1. #1
    * Chris
    Guest

    I get it now!

    For months now, I’ve thought that a new agent storming into the industry without a solid background in the literary world should be given a chance. I thought so many of you were being harsh on this topic. Well, a recent conversation with this type of “new agent” has made me understand why so many of you experienced people out there, view taking on a new agent as a negative thing. I asked a ton of questions relating to the publishing industry and their background. Their contacts were minimal and their answers were somewhat vague. Then it HIT me…. Is this the person I want representing me? Negotiating for me? Nope. I need someone with experience and a good $track$ record. End of story. Yes, I know there are always exceptions to the rule, but I now have a whole new outlook on new agents/new agencies. Thanks for your help.



  2. #2
    Wonky
    Guest

    Re: I get it now!

    Well, an agent has to have connections in the publishing world to get your MS read. If a new agent used to be, say, an editor, he/she will have such connections. If a new agent was a shoe salesman, well...

  3. #3
    Bret Burns
    Guest

    Re: I get it now!

    I disagree. I wasted alot of time with the big fish. The odds are stacked against us in getting contracts with them. Once you determine their legitimacy, new agents are my preffered route. Reason?

    They have to take the time to consider a project with potential. They don't represent established writers with proven fan bases and sales records. They have to give new writers a shot and are more likely to take the time to read your proposal carefully enough to be able to determine the revisions that need to be made. They're more likely to spend the time to provide you with the feedback you need to make your project marketable to the publishers.

    In book deals with major publishers, they don't spend a dime promoting your work. They expect you to reinvest your earnings after each book run. With a smaller publishing company, you must also spend your own money to promote your work but you also learn how to promote it more efficiently with a limited budget. You probably end up pocketing more in the end.

  4. #4
    Wonky
    Guest

    Re: I get it now!

    What I am saying is that a lot of these new "agents" really don't know what they are doing.

  5. #5
    J. Conway
    Guest

    Re: I get it now!

    I agree, Wonky. But what about the newbie agent at a well-established agency?

  6. #6
    Joe Zeff
    Guest

    Re: I get it now!

    I've no problem with a new agent who worked in an agency and can (at least) borrow contacts to get started. I'd not be interested in a new agent with no agency or publishing experience, because the only thing such an agent can do is send out proposals to strangers. The editors won't know this person from Adam or Eve, and the scripts will simply go into the slush pile. Why pay 15% for that when I can do it myself with just as much chance for success? 90% of all new businesses fail, and that goes for literary agencies as well. The 10% that make it are almost always those founded by somebody with prior experience, and that's the way to bet.

  7. #7
    Simon Says
    Guest

    Re: I get it now!

    If you are looking at a new agency - be sure that it's run by someonw who has prior agent experience at an established agency or at the very least is a publising vet - who knows how the business works and has connections at a number of houses. New agents are fine -provided that they are working at an established agency.

    It's the people who hang out their own shingle w/out industry experience and connections that it's best to avoid.

  8. #8
    Wonky
    Guest

    Re: I get it now!

    You know those cheap books they sell at the supermarket checkout? Once I was flipping through one called "100 Home-Based Businesses." Literary Agent was listed.

  9. #9
    M. Lee
    Guest

    Re: I get it now!

    I have to echo what a lot of other have said here, which is that some industry experience is required, even if it's on the publishing side.

    My agent spent 15 years as an editor with a number of high-profile publishers and sold a YA series for a six-figure advance her first year out.

  10. #10
    Wonky
    Guest

    Re: I get it now!

    I think a newbie agent is the best because they aren't ashamed to make a fool of themselves with your manuscript. Plus they will work for much less than a real agent.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts