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Thread: Lyrical prose

  1. #1
    Charles Humphrey
    Guest

    Lyrical prose

    What is the definition of lyrical prose?

    If you believe, and you were told, your YA novel is written in a lyrical prose style, is this something that could touched on in a query?

    Thanks!



  2. #2
    Charles Humphrey
    Guest

    Re: Lyrical prose

    That last sentence should be worded, that could be touched on in a query?

  3. #3
    c. g.
    Guest

    Re: Lyrical prose

    Oh for God's sake. We all make typos. We all misspell words. We all screw up with language sometimes. It doesn't make us stupid, bad writers, or bozos.

  4. #4
    c. g.
    Guest

    Re: Lyrical prose

    Sorry!!! I didn't realize that you were correcting your own language. I thought someone else was doing it!

    As for lyrical prose, I would think they mean poetic, literary prose. I'm not sure I would mention it in a query. It might sound odd if you say it about yourself, and it might be misunderstood or turn some agents off if they -- like us -- don't quite know what it means. They could think it means flowerly or overblown. Poetic in some hands is a good thing, in others' it isn't.

    I need to get to work! I've become addicted to posting! Someone shut me up!

  5. #5
    Rozinante
    Guest

    Re: Lyrical prose

    Sure. I don't see any reason not to toss in the word "lyrical" to your query. It will give the agent an idea of what kind of book it is. Why not. Just be graceful about. Or, um, lyrical.

  6. #6
    Denise .
    Guest

    Re: Lyrical prose

    I think you should show, not tell. If you say, I've been told my prose are lyrical or literary, with the volume of junk that comes through, the agent would probably think, yeah, right, you and 10,000 writers.

    But if you set the tone of your query in the same lyrical prose style as the novel, they will be able to draw that conclusion for themselves, thinking, ah hah!, I have discovered a lyrical genius!

  7. #7
    Happy Soybean
    Guest

    Re: Lyrical prose

    ha ha.

    but what if I want to be a stupid bad writer bozo? That would look nice on a name tag.

    I'd be careful about calling your writing lyrical in a query, especially if you're basing this on someone's comments and if you're not entirely sure what it means.

    I usually like lyrical writing, but some people view that phrase as negative. They think "lyrical" means "all fance and no plot or anything of interest whatsoever." I guess it depends on how you work it into the query.

  8. #8
    c. g.
    Guest

    Re: Lyrical prose

    LOL. It could be a website: stupidbadwriterbozo.com

  9. #9
    Charles Humphrey
    Guest

    Re: Lyrical prose

    Thanks, everyone, for your replies. I like the idea of making sure my query has a lyrical tone to it.

  10. #10
    BPM BPM
    Guest

    Re: Lyrical prose

    I agree that lesser writers could call their prose lyrical as a disguise for their boring plot. All of the best literary novels have some lyrical traits in an intriguing, fast paced plot. But there's alot of opinions on what actually makes up lyrical prose.

    My opinion: it should include a phonetic style that's similar to how the characters talk and think. My first two novels are very lyrical but I've never pitched them as being so. My style also alludes to jazz music where each sentence has a certain number of syllables like a trumpet does in a song. Two or three short sentences would be followed with a long sentence two or three times as long as the preceeding ones.

    A popular example of lyrical prose is JT Leroy's SARAH. But that book bored me, just a personal opinion.

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