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  1. #1
    Jena Grace
    Guest

    School Appearances

    Have any YA writers here done them? I'm *guessing* it involves a reading, brief speech, and maybe a Q&A session. I'm sure I'll find out more later, but I'm hoping to get some feedback from authors who've actually done this. Thanks!



  2. #2
    Anthony Ravenscroft
    Guest

    Re: School Appearances

    One of my gripes with "YA" is that it seems to mean something like "between 7 & 29."

    I suppose what'll be expected of you depends a lot on the actual grade/ages you're addressing. My stepmom (a teacher) says it's handy to have visuals in front of the kids before they sit down, so what restlessness happens tends to be positive. A flip chart, a cover blowup, a prop -- whatever.

    Also depends on whether any of the kids might've read it. If not, there's no way they can ask smart questions about the plot or characters, except on what you've just said. You might want to go into how you write, where your ideas came from, & so on.

  3. #3
    Jena Grace
    Guest

    Re: School Appearances

    "You might want to go into how you write, where your ideas came from, & so on."

    Yeah, I'd like to do that. I'd like to hear from the kids, too, especially the ones who are interested in writing.

  4. #4
    john cother
    Guest

    Re: School Appearances

    Recently I spoke to 5 Senior English classes at a local high school.

    I read two or three excerpts and told them a few jokes relating to my books. If you don't make kids laugh, you lose them in a hurry.

    I talked about the "how" of my writing.


    Then I did a Q&A.


    went great. the teacher wants me back in the fall.


    hope that helps a bit

  5. #5
    Bryan Reardon
    Guest

    Re: School Appearances

    This seems like a great way to market your book and stay in touch with your audience. How did you go about getting asked to come speak?

  6. #6
    john cother
    Guest

    Re: School Appearances

    Been some local media on my book. An English teacher called about coming to speak toher classes.

  7. #7
    Jena Grace
    Guest

    Re: School Appearances

    I'm pretty sure the authors contacts the school, unless, as John pointed out, the school makes the first move. The school can then, if they choose, order copies of the book in advance from local book stores or from the publisher itself.

    Thanks for the advice, John. You're right about making 'em laugh!

  8. #8
    TANNIA E. ORTIZ-LOPES
    Guest

    Re: School Appearances

    I have done that. It is a great experience. About two years go I went to my olders son, Middle School to give the talks. I also brought one of my poems and read it to the 7th and 8th graders. We then discussed it and they expressed their feelings, etc. Their impressions were very interesting. I didn't read the poem to the 6th graders.

    I talked to each class about "How to write" and helped them to loose their fear of writting short stories. After I gave my talk, we wrote a story together.

    Each class chose their own topic. Then I asked for some volunteers to write down the story and some artists too. Some stories even have special sounds effects. At that part, they get very loud and laugh a lot. The artists did the drawings on the board. The writers wrote the story on a piece of paper as it was told by the rest of the class.

    Once we have the volunteers, we then chose the topic, time/space, and the characters.

    I helped them to keep focus on the story and every once in a while I will summarize it so the writers could verify they did not miss any important or funny detail.

    At the end, the writers read the story aloud and we all laughed a lot. The class homework was to type the story nicely and give it to the teacher.

    For me was interesting to see how each different grade and age group chose their topics. The older the kids got more complicated and even a littler morbid stories. The sixth graders kept their story childlish and funny.

    I STRONGLY RECOMMEND DOING THIS ACTIVITY. It's good for you and it is good for them. Writting is easy and fun but students thinks it is difficult and complicated. I got many compliments from all the Language Arts teachers and several students too.

    GOOD LUCK

  9. #9
    john cother
    Guest

    Re: School Appearances

    In a Q&A with one class, a young lady asked, "Just how much money are you making on this book?


    hahaha


    I said "SO far not a lot. Why dont you buy it and help me out!"

  10. #10
    Zana Miles
    Guest

    Re: School Appearances

    Thank you all for giving back to our youth. If we could simply rekindle a love for reading and writing in one or two each time, we will have made a good impression on our world...agreed?

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