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  1. #1
    Richard -
    Guest

    "Oh no!" category

    Al Zuckerman contacted me about obtaining the movie rights to my book. When Mr. Zuckerman found out the book was POD, he said "Getting rights would be a nightmare" and declined to deal with my publisher. True story.

    PS: I have another book out on a commercial press.

    I would kill myself but I have to write another book. There's a lesson here for some you considering POD.



  2. #2
    Roy Abrahams
    Guest

    Re: "Oh no!" category

    Sorry that had to happen, Richard. But thank you for sharing it on the board; hope those considering POD learn from it.

    Roy

  3. #3
    Catherine S
    Guest

    Re: "Oh no!" category

    What company did you use?? If you just used a POD printer (digital press), then you're the publisher and you own the rights. If you used a self-publishing company, many don't take your rights, either - Booklocker doesn't, for instance. Regardless of what you do, you have to read the contracts and if you don't understand them, go to a lawyer... and know what you're signing. That doesn't just hold true for publishing, either...it's true if you're renting a car, selling a house...everything.

    C.

  4. #4
    Joe Zeff
    Guest

    Re: "Oh no!" category

    I can only speak about Xlibris, because I've only used it. They, at least, own no rights. You control them and have every right to do whatever you want with them. You can even cut a deal with a traditional publisher to bring out a new edition of your work, as long as they don't mind it being available through Xlibris as well. Several people have managed to do exactly that. As far as movie rights go, you own them if you use Xlibris.

    I don't know what the contract wwith your POD service is, so YMMV and probably does. Frankly, it sounds to me like Mr. Zuckerman was either looking for an excuse to say No, or he has to deal with "suits" with rigid ideas of what can and can't be done and knew they'd never approve it. I'd say your best bet is to find out where you stand on the rights, and let him know. Never give up; never surrender!

  5. #5
    Richard -
    Guest

    Re: "Oh no!" category

    I don't want my compaint popping up on Google, so I'd rather not name the publisher. But it's one who advertises here. They refer rejected submissions to a vanity press in PA. The authors they accept are not charged any fees. The publisher produces a quality book and ARC's are sent to about thirty reviewers. The contract is five years. Yes, in this case, I would have fared better with Xlibris or similar outfit. I won't deal with POD publishers again until they have distribution channels in place and accept book returns. Hard lessons like this, IMO, are part of the game.

  6. #6
    Richard -
    Guest

    PS

    The contract specifies that the publisher only can sell movie rights. The author gets 50% of moneys received by the publisher, minus full agent fee.

  7. #7
    Mr. Vomaxx
    Guest

    Re: PS

    I am very much surprised by all this. I had thought that one of the chief advantages of POD is that the author retains all rights, and could at any time do what he liked with his work. If there are now POD companies that retain rights, I would certainly avoid ever publishing anything with them. After all, the great hope of many--most--POD authors is that their work will be taken up by a "real" publisher. That won't happen very often, but when it can it would be awful if the author couldn't go with it!

  8. #8
    Catherine S
    Guest

    Re: PS

    Well, if you pay then you're self-publishing (POD also simply means digital printing, or print-on-demand, so that's not necessarily the best term to use when discussing self-publishing) then you usually own all the rights...but if you don't invest anything at all, then I guess you have to "give" the investors something and in this case, it's rights.

    I would think any company associated with PA would be known throughout the industry and that's most likely why the person in question chose to avoid any sort of negotiation...PA hardly has a reputation for being reasonable (whether earned or not) and the last time an author ticked them off, the company owner went on the internet and released personal information about the author having a mental health issue...who wants to do business with people like that?

    Cat

  9. #9
    Richard -
    Guest

    Re: PS

    Right. But the "PA" I meant was Pennsylvania.

  10. #10
    Anthony Ravenscroft
    Guest

    Re: "Oh no!" category

    My guess is that this is what POD means to a chunk of the world at large. However unfair it might be, it sounds like POD could be a serious Big Black Blot,

    Catherine, "reality" doesn't matter here. If Mr Zuckerman reflexively associates the term with "not worth all the trouble," & he's not alone, then all your faith in POD will not make it attractive to an industry that's very important to writers.

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