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Thread: a few questions

  1. #1
    david lloyd
    Guest

    a few questions

    Hi! I know this is not really to the genre of this discussion board, but I need a willing published writer to answer a few questions. I am currently doing an essay for my university course and I need to ask a published writer some general questions (mind you nothing personal). If anyone is willing I would really appreciate it.

    Thanks!



  2. #2
    James Macdonald
    Guest

    Re: a few questions

    Sure, David. What do you want to know?

  3. #3
    david lloyd
    Guest

    Re: a few questions

    Hi James! I had uni so i just got back on, sorry about the wait. There are only a few questions to answer so thanks for your time.

    1. What is your highest level of education?

    2. Do you believe that it would help to have a form of trianing (degree in Creative Writing etc) to become a competant writer?

    3. Why is it that you chose to become a writer?

    4. What advice can you give to aspiring writers?


    Again thaks for your particapation!
    Bye

  4. #4
    Robin Gosse
    Guest

    Re: a few questions

    I can offer my two cents on that one as well. Perhaps a comparitive essay may be of use to you.

    My highest level of education is the third semister of college, I'm currently attending The College of the North Atlantic doing the Computer Support Specialist course as a back-up career.

    I do believe it helps to have education in your field, it never hurts to have formal education. I actually intend on going to university in a year to persue just that, a masters in creative writing, followed by a degree in education.

    I was always interested in writing, it had a certain magickal power to it, to be able to create and destroy with a thought, a word. I've been writing since the 4th grade, and I'm now 19 with 2 published books. Funny how life works out.

    My advice to the newbies is this... to hell with what people say, writing is an art. My brothers called me an idiot for taking on a project bigger then I was, but I showed them now didn't I! An hour per day is all you really need, I wrote my first book in high school, and some nights I didn't even stop to sleep, to the horror of my parents. Writing is a dream come true, but I warn you of this: Don't get too attached to your characters, after writing over 1200 pages in my novel series, I dream about them, miss them when I don't write, and cry when I bring pain upon them as part of the story; I laugh at thier jokes, and jump when I see someone who resembles one of the characters. It's hard to teach yourself that your characters don't exist sometimes, but it's a risk we all pay when we REALLY write. In summary, do what you love. If you don't throb for your job, you'll never be happy.

    Blessed be, hope this helps.
    - Spider

  5. #5
    Glen T. Brock
    Guest

    Re: a few questions

    David,

    I had three years of college.

    I do not believe formal academic training is neccessary at all to be a successfull writer.

    I became a writer when my life experiences inspired me to write about them. This doesn't mean all my writing is autobiographical. But you do write about what you know. That means you write about experiences you have had, stories you've heard, and books you've read.

    Writting is like riding a bicycle. The physical process comes with practice and is automatic. Knowing what to do is more complicated. Knowing how to get there takes knowledge and experience.

    Glen T. Brock

  6. #6
    James Macdonald
    Guest

    Re: a few questions

    1. What is your highest level of education?

    I have a BA in English Literature, and some graduate credits.

    2. Do you believe that it would help to have a form of training (degree in Creative Writing etc) to become a competant writer?

    No, that isn't necessary. I personally have never taken a Creative Writing course, far less a degree program. While I know some people who have taken such programs and subsequently become writers, I know an equal number of folks who took a degree in physics and also became writers.

    3. Why is it that you chose to become a writer?

    Because it beats working? Actually, I suspect it's because I found that I can do it. I'd been writing stories since I was a pre-teen. When I started selling them (in my thirties), and discovered I could make a living at this, I became a full-time writer. I don't think there was ever a time when I wasn't a "writer." I think that's something that you are. The only question was the degree of skill, and that came from practice.

    4. What advice can you give to aspiring writers?

    Write your book. Talking about writing isn't writing, thinking about writing isn't writing, only writing is writing.

    Write it. Finish it. Send it out (to paying markets only) until hell won't have it. And while you're sending it around, write your next book.

    Oh, yes: Have a life in the meantime. Go places, do things, observe everything.

  7. #7
    Verb Verb
    Guest

    Re: a few questions

    Fiction and Non Fiction:

    Each absorb writers from different fields.

    Non Fiction would appear to grab those with credits behind their name; to include experience, education, and some pertinent insight into the subject.

    Fiction is for the dreamer. Writers who, regardless of education or experience, can imagine worlds of horror, of love, of peace, and of fascination.

    Education helps in all aspects of life, so to those who learn the art of writing without compromising the art of imagination, kudos.

    Verb

  8. #8
    Jerry Loeb
    Guest

    Re: a few questions

    Yo! David!

    Check out my novel ANTHEM (Jan. 2004) on www.amazon.com which will answer some of your questions re Why Be a Writer? Go to ANTHEM's search Inside the Book (SIB) aspect and troll through some of the dialogue and author's background (back cover on the SIB.)College? No time since I was 35 years flying fast airplanes and chasing down MiG drivers and drug traffickers. But I tell you this, if you have basic street smarts, think out of the box, check six, carefully observe people and ask questions, get some down and dirty real-world ups and downs, and listen very carefully to real-world dialogue; you will be able to write nonfiction and fiction like you cannot believe at this point in your life. Y'gotta take some hits and hurts along the way to produce good work. Why write? Because most folks have the attention span of a gnat (apologiies to the gnats), but good writing has staying power. So what should you do? Get a good education and while you are doing that, write down every idea that "hears" good in your head and keep packing those notes away for future reference. The biggie? Keep a daily journal so you can sharpen your writing skills to be observant, concise, precise and creative. It'll all come together when your life experiences, heart, mind and spirit all converge to that "biggo itch intersection" to really write and do it really well. Good luck and hang in there!

    Best wishes,

    Jerry K. Loeb
    Author/ ANTHEM (Jan. 2004)
    Borders, www.amazon.com, www.bn.com et al

  9. #9
    Alison Cunningham
    Guest

    Re: a few questions

    Hi,
    It does not take a college degree to be a writer! All one needs to be a writer, in my opinion, is a good command of English,a magical way with words, a vivid and creative imagination and the apptitude to obseve and absorb everything around you. Travel helps as well. I carry a small notebook with me wherever I go and jot down notes. One never knows which experience might give you the premise for your next book.
    Just my opinion.
    Alison.

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