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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Thoughts on logline...

    "After an unknowing encounter with his future boss, a self-absorbed job candidate must come to terms with his greatest weaknesses before he can land the job."

  2. #2
    Rogue Mutt
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    Seems pretty generic.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
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    Ok. Thank you.

  4. #4
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    Hi Gina,

    You need to be much more specific as to what the main conflict and stakes are for your protagonist. I mean obviously the stakes are about him getting the job - but there's no sense of consequences i.e. what will happen if he doesn't land it. Most people don't get most jobs they apply for and they simply apply for other jobs. What is compelling about your scenario? I'd be happy to help if you provide more information about your story.

    Here's a link to a great article on writing loglines. http://www.twoadverbs.com/logline.pdf

  5. #5
    Senior Member John Oberon's Avatar
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    I swear the author of that article uses the verb "struggles" in just about every one of his examples. Sheesh, get the thesaurus, dude.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Oberon View Post
    I swear the author of that article uses the verb "struggles" in just about every one of his examples. Sheesh, get the thesaurus, dude.
    Well since he specifically says in the article that "The most useful word in writing a logline is “struggle,” because it presents the goal (and scope) of the story and conveys drama. Conflict (the basis of drama) is inherent in the word “struggle.” it's not all that surprising that the word appears in so many of his examples.

    The author of the article Chris Lockhart is one of the most successful and well-respected story analysts in the business and has worked for the largest agencies for years so he's kind of an expert on loglines.

    You don't have to use the word struggle (I rarely do) but you need to make the struggle clear in the logline.

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