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  1. #21
    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mutt View Post
    Nah. I was talking about a romantic young adult story that also spawned a hit movie..
    No child. You called the novel a romance, which it is not. Making a film of it has absolutely nothing to do with what the book is and it's genre. As always, you're trying to change the subject to remove attention from your mistake.
    You were talking about the rules to write bodice-rippers for grown-ups.
    Again, you're wrong. The definition I gave is what makes a romance. Not an adult or young asult romance, I defined a romance. And the one who provided that definition is the Romance Writers of America, an organization of people writing in that genre. You can hold any opinion you care to. But 55% of the new fiction released is romance. And as part of it, there is a young adult romance genre.

    Here's something else you can try to ignore or disparage. It's from Wikipedia.
    In the world of romance, the story always focuses around the central love of two individuals. The protagonist of the story, who is usually female, is always looking at the antagonist, who is usually male. This love is made clear from the very beginning of the story, but is never accomplished until the very end. The reason that romance is such an eye-catching genre is because of the heart pounding thrills that drive the story. The road blocks, obstacles, and struggles that each of the characters must face to develop this love between them is an emotional trip that any reader would love to explore.

    Since the genre is such an exciting one to explore, many subgenres have sprung from its initial path. The young adult romance subgenre is geared toward young adults by having the protagonist be a young adult themselves and have issues that would be relatable to young adult lives. The novel draws them in by having the protagonist struggle through the same emotional issues of the young adult and in the end gain the love which they set out for.
    I'll say this about you. You're more consistently wrong than anyone else I've seen on the Internet.



  2. #22
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest
    So you're down to using Wikipedia as a source now?

    BTW, from Amazon's The Fault In Our Stars page:
    #3 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Teen & Young Adult > Romance > Contemporary

    Whoops. Someone go tell Amazon they filed it wrong!
    Last edited by Rogue Mutt; 10-09-2015 at 10:38 PM.

  3. #23
    Senior Member
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    343
    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mutt View Post
    So you're down to using Wikipedia as a source now?

    BTW, from Amazon's The Fault In Our Stars page:
    #3 in Kindle Store > Kindle eBooks > Teen & Young Adult > Romance > Contemporary

    Whoops. Someone go tell Amazon they filed it wrong!
    Of course you ignored that they also also listed it as:
    #1 in Books > Teens > Literature & Fiction > Social & Family Issues > Death & Dying
    #3 in Books > Teens > Literature & Fiction > Social & Family Issues > Self Esteem & Reliance

    So are you claiming that, The Fault in Our Stars, is a Death & Dying genre book, now? Those listing are generic categories, not genre listings. And anyone with a functioning brain can see that. But you're desperately trying to find something—anything—to divert attention from the fact that you were wrong when you claimed it as romance, wrong every time you attempted to justify your mistake, and will continue to be wrong.

    Doing your research before you speak is helpful in avoiding a case of foot in mouth disease.

  4. #24
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greenstein View Post
    Of course you ignored that they also also listed it as:
    #1 in Books > Teens > Literature & Fiction > Social & Family Issues > Death & Dying
    #3 in Books > Teens > Literature & Fiction > Social & Family Issues > Self Esteem & Reliance

    So are you claiming that, The Fault in Our Stars, is a Death & Dying genre book, now? Those listing are generic categories, not genre listings. And anyone with a functioning brain can see that. But you're desperately trying to find something—anything—to divert attention from the fact that you were wrong when you claimed it as romance, wrong every time you attempted to justify your mistake, and will continue to be wrong.

    Doing your research before you speak is helpful in avoiding a case of foot in mouth disease.
    Well from what I've heard it is about people who are dying.

    All you're doing is insulting me because you can't stand the fact you're wrong. You'd have the person who started this thread believe all romances are the same. Of course that's not true. I'd have to ask my sisters, but I'm sure they've read romances that don't end Happily Ever After. Suggesting "and must have an "emotionally satisfying and optimistic ending."" is just nonsense. But that's the problem with you in general: you think everything can be done like a paint-by-numbers. So you go around telling everyone they have to do things the same way that you do, though with your track record doing the opposite is a much better idea.

    Anyway, once again I'll have to be the better man and end it so it doesn't drag on forever. As much as I enjoy these nightly chats, there are better things to do. I'll be happy to let the geriatric toddler have the last word if it suits him.
    Last edited by Rogue Mutt; 10-10-2015 at 09:33 PM.

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