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  1. #1
    Junior Member Marci Mathers's Avatar
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    Young Adult Novel Idea

    Due to budget cuts, I am an unemployed school librarian. What better time to try to write my own Young Adult novel, right? Well, maybe not.

    Many of my female students would ask for a "romance" that has a happy ending and no one dies.

    Is that even possible these days?

    Thanks.



  2. #2
    Rogue Mutt
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    I'm sure it's possible. Whether people will like it is another issue.

  3. #3
    Senior Member John Oberon's Avatar
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    Sure it's possible...and people will gobble it up if it's well-written.

    Heck, they'll gobble it up even if it's NOT well-written, as long as it's a good story.
    Last edited by John Oberon; 10-05-2015 at 11:29 AM.

  4. #4
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    Many of my female students would ask for a "romance" that has a happy ending and no one dies.
    One of the prerequisites for romance is that the end, if not happy, is positive, with the promise of a happy ending. The romance section of the bookstore is filled with books exactly like what you mention.

    One of the first things I'd do is join your local RWA chapter. And if one isn't nearby, join the online group.They're supportive, helpful, fun, and membership provides a chance to meet successful authors in your genre. Depending on the location you may meet and talk with agents and publishers, and have visits by authors you've probably read. And, their yearly convention is a hoot.

    Another thing, if you've not read it, is to pick up a copy of Debra Dixon's, GMC: Goal Motivation & Conflict, from any online seller, or as a hard copy from Deb's website. It's a warm, easy read, and a gentle introduction to the nuts-and-bolts professional issues every writer should be aware of as they write.

    Hope this helps.

  5. #5
    Rogue Mutt
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    One of the prerequisites for romance is that the end, if not happy, is positive, with the promise of a happy ending.
    You're obviously not aware of The Fault in Our Stars, which is what I assumed the poster is referring to as far as young adult romances that end tragically. And then there's most anything by Nicholas Sparks.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogue Mutt View Post
    You're obviously not aware of The Fault in Our Stars, which is what I assumed the poster is referring to as far as young adult romances that end tragically. And then there's most anything by Nicholas Sparks.
    You're obviously not aware of what a romance novel is. I know it goes against your philosophy, but you really should do at least some basic research into the subject you're pretending to be knowledgeable in.

    1. The Fault in Our Stars is not a romance because if does not follow the points that are the hallmark of romance novels.
    2. The Fault in Our Stars was not published by a romance publisher.
    3. The Fault in Our Stars is not listed as a romance by Amazon, and the reviews don't call it such.
    4. Sparks writes love stories, not romances.
    5. Romantic novels, too, are not romance. And I know that because I write them. I also spent six years as a member of the RWA—where I was the chapter librarian—discussing the subject of romance writing with writers, editors, and publishers.

    Had you taken even a moment to find out what a romance novel was, you would have found the RWA's criteria: "The romance novel or romantic novel is a literary genre. Novels of this type of genre fiction place their primary focus on the relationship and romantic love between two people, and must have an "emotionally satisfying and optimistic ending." There are many subgenres of the romance novel including fantasy, historical, science fiction and paranormal."

    Once again: If you don't act like a dick I won't be able to call you on it. But if you do...

  7. #7
    Rogue Mutt
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    You do realize the title of this thread is "Young Adult Novel" and not "Romance Novel" right? And in the post romance was given with quotes. You're talking about the sort of romance books my sisters read, which are adult books, not young adult.

  8. #8
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    Obviously, you didn't take the time to read the question asked in the first post, which talked about romance:
    Many of my female students would ask for a "romance" that has a happy ending and no one dies. Is that even possible these days?
    And just as obviously, you've forgotten what you said, because I responded to you displaying your ignorance of what romance is:
    You're obviously not aware of The Fault in Our Stars, which is what I assumed the poster is referring to as far as young adult romances that end tragically.
    You obviously didn't know what a romance is, so I clarified.

  9. #9
    Rogue Mutt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greenstein View Post
    Obviously, you didn't take the time to read the question asked in the first post, which talked about romance.
    Yes, romance with quotes around it. Meaning not necessarily a romance from the romance section of the bookstore but a story with romantic elements. It's really not that hard to figure out.

  10. #10
    Junior Member Marci Mathers's Avatar
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    I am sorry, guys. I'm new and I obviously made a mistake. I did not mean to cause friction. Young Adult is not a genre, it is a target age group, 12-18 http://www.ala.org/yalsa/guidelines/whitepapers/yalitor at least that's what I was taught in in the collection development class I had to take to complete my master's degree in an ALA (American Library Association) accredited program. But I could be wrong.

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