HomeWritersLiterary AgentsEditorsPublishersResourcesDiscussion
Forum Login | Join the discussion
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    46

    Agent for a certain project

    I recently got some solid advice from a literary agent (Thanks Rebecca Pratt). Is there a list of agents who will consider a "re-publication" for a title that had been previously published?

    Or is this just something I will have to ask countless times to every single agency office?

    I have the rights and I copyrighted it myself so there's no issue with intellectual property or such... I just need a new publisher as the one I used is no longer with us.

  2. #2
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Hagler View Post
    I recently got some solid advice from a literary agent (Thanks Rebecca Pratt). Is there a list of agents who will consider a "re-publication" for a title that had been previously published?

    Or is this just something I will have to ask countless times to every single agency office?

    I have the rights and I copyrighted it myself so there's no issue with intellectual property or such... I just need a new publisher as the one I used is no longer with us.
    Probably have to ask countless times.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,142
    Full disclosure: I have no direct experience upon which to base my advice; my knowledge, such as it is, comes solely from the Interweb. However, I did sleep in a Holiday Inn not long ago, and I follow Janet Reid's blog (both of them). She has addressed this issue more than once—that of self-published, and by extrapolation, re-published—authors. You should search her blog yourself, but here's what I think you'll find:

    First, there is no extant list of agents who deal—or don't deal—with self-published (for brevity's sake, let's define "self" to include "pre"). Agents want to make money; if they sniff an opportunity, they'll respond. So don't look for the list you seek; instead, treat this as you would a virgin, unsullied manuscript: Write a query letter. (I know, you don't like query letters. Nobody does. But if you're like most of us, it's the only door we have to knock on.)

    Pitch the novel the same as you'd pitch any other. Toward the bottom of the letter, where you insert the housekeeping stuff (genre, word count, personal history), you casually mention that, oh, by the way, this novel was published in such year by such publisher. Reveal what happened to your publisher, AND THEN PROVIDE THE SALES HISTORY. Rhyme and verse. Printed units sold at this price, e-books sold at that price. Everything.

    From there on, you're at the mercy of gods who ridicule our miserable efforts. Some sources (agent blogs) say that a self-pubbed work has to show sales of a few thousand units for an agent (and by extension, a new publisher) to take notice. Others peg the break point at nine thousand. (That's the internet for you, no consistency at all.) Don't worry about it; it is what it is and you have no say-so. Just write a dynamite query letter, include your publishing history, and hope you're sending it to an agent who thinks you've got smash hit.

    Hope this helps. Good luck.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    46
    Jayce, you and I are on the same page. That is kind of how I got to Rebecca Pratt, who led me in this direction. I had been querying the story again, with the notes at the bottom I explained the situation... (Which I will explain here):

    Starting 7 years ago, I began to query the story. After numerous rejections I signed an agency. The agent I was working with claimed to be working on publication, and after a few weeks said she had found a publisher that would work with us. What I was unaware of was this was her own attempt at being a publisher and I signed a contract. The things that did not happen were this: The book was never to be printed in POD format, and it was. The book was to be promoted locally and regionally, and it wasn't. I finally asked for some promotional material and assistance in doing it myself, which ended in silence. When I checked the next time, the publisher had folded and closed shop, with the agency right behind them.

    SO, there is no reason to speak of sales... there are none to speak of. I had gotten some reviews and they were very favorable. I listed a couple in my query letter, but so far it hasn't led to serious interest. The reason for my question at the beginning of this thread is that of all the NEW queries I sent, Rebecca Pratt is the only person that has taken the time to actually answer it and gave me the advice to find an agent that actually does re-publications. She said that not all agents do, including herself. SO, that led me here. Now I'm in a less-than-starting point situation with this book, as not only do I need to find an agent... but also an agent that handles this sort of thing.

    It is yet another brick wall covered with barbed wire.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,142
    Chris: Had comment all typed in but hit the wrong button and zapped it.

    Bummer.

    Sorry. Will try again tomorrow, when it's not so late.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1,142
    What I was gonna say was this: That the publisher went belly up doesn't alter things all that much. You still pitch your novel via a query letter, and you don't worry whether the agent handles pre-pubbed work or not (since there's no way of knowing anyhow). In the housekeeping paragraph, include a line that goes something like, "HAGLER'S QUEST was contracted to Scum Suck Publishing, which ceased operation; all rights have reverted to me."

    If the agent is interested in pursuing, they'll google Scum Suck Publishing, look up your title on BookScan, and you both proceed from there. The important thing is, you've revealed that your novel has a history. As to the rights thing, you'll need something to back that up, if nothing more than undeliverable certified letters of demand to the last known addresses of both your agent and her publishing house.

    Anyway, that's what I would do.

    Luck to you.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts