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  1. #1
    DaBlaRR
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    Dialogue heavy chapter

    So the current chapter I am writing is extremely dialogue heavy. Most of the chapter is dialogue because it is a very vital part of the evolution of my main character. So it isn't senseless dialogue.

    I try to break it up with description/narrative, but sometimes (not all the time), it feels forced and unnatural. When it feels unnatural, it almost dilutes the importance of the dialogue and the intended message.

    In your opinion, is it okay to have a chapter, here and there, that is made up of mostly dialogue? Or should there ALWAYS be a balance between dialogue and narrative?

    Also keep in mind it isn't one scene, it's different scenes and different locations, but all of which is a lot of dialogue.
    Last edited by DaBlaRR; 04-26-2015 at 05:57 PM.

  2. #2
    Rogue Mutt
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaBlaRR View Post
    So the current chapter I am writing is extremely dialogue heavy. Most of the chapter is dialogue because it is a very vital part of the evolution of my main character. So it isn't senseless dialogue.

    I try to break it up with description/narrative, but sometimes (not all the time), it feels forced and unnatural. When it feels unnatural, it almost dilutes the importance of the dialogue and the intended message.

    In your opinion, is it okay to have a chapter, here and there, that is made up of mostly dialogue? Or should there ALWAYS be a balance between dialogue and narrative?

    Also keep in mind it isn't one scene, it's different scenes and different locations, but all of which is a lot of dialogue.
    There doesn't always need to be a balance. Stuff like this there's not some kind of ideal ratio. Just go with the flow. As long as your entire book isn't that way.

  3. #3
    DaBlaRR
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    Thanks. And no, it definitely isn't all that way. That's why as I was writing it I was second guessing myself.

    That said though, I'm not overly descriptive either. Somethings I like leaving up to the readers imagination, to an extent. I've always had a hard time getting through a novel where the author tells me every little detail about what a person or place looks like. When I choose to read something, opposed to maybe watching a movie, I like to also interpret those types of things in my own way. But maybe that's just me.

  4. #4
    Member K.S. Crooks's Avatar
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    There doesn't have to be balance. If you are writing a war novel there will be times with almost no dialogue as the characters are busy fighting. No one would expect or understand why the 100 samurai or 20 marines are engaged in pages of dialogue while they are trying to kill each other. The same goes for the opposite. If the characters are planning, recovering from a situation or explaining things to each other then there will not be much action taking place. Go with flows and feels natural. Let the story sort itself.
    K.S. Crooks - Dreamer and Author
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  5. #5
    Administrator Wickett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K.S. Crooks View Post
    No one would expect or understand why the 100 samurai or 20 marines are engaged in pages of dialogue while they are trying to kill each other.
    No, but that would be extremely cool. I'm all for someone attempting that. Haha.

    I agree with the prevailing opinion here already. I think that if the dialogue is good and intense then there's nothing wrong with a change of pace. Just start writing and let it flow. In between narrative may just come to you at the right times. Read it several times to make sure it sounds natural.

  6. #6
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    Here's the problem: All too often, dialog ends up as talking heads, and that's boring. You also have to watch out that the purpose of the conversation isn't to "inform" the reader of backstory and/or detail they really don't require to follow the action in that scene. Since you mention that it seems forced, that could well be the problem you're seeing. Remember, the reader is seeking to be entertained by having an emotional experience, not informed. So apply the same test to dialog that you would any other point:

    Does it move the plot meaningfully?
    Does it develop character?
    Does it meaningfully set the scene?

    If the answer isn't yes to at least one of those, toss it.

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