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  1. #1
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    Everyone Should Teach Writing

    Making the case for writing across the curriculum:

    http://www.insidehighered.com/views/....pPQ3dKEJ.dpbs



  2. #2
    Senior Member John Oberon's Avatar
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    They've been saying this for years. They said it when I was in college. If teachers wanted to do it, they'd do it. They don't want to do it. Why should they put more work on themselves? And hey, do you know how rare it is nowadays to find even writing teachers who actually know how to write well, who can look at a piece of writing and see the errors and tell a student how to improve it? Good grief, I went to my area high school, and the 11-12 English teacher could barely speak understandably let alone write. It's just one of the many reasons I chose to homeschool my kids.

    Great idea, but good luck implementing it.

  3. #3
    Rogue Mutt
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    Not everyone should teach writing. There are too many like Craig who need to learn about it first.

  4. #4
    Administrator Wickett's Avatar
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    I don't really have anything to add to this, I think you both have already covered the biggest points. I would like to think that teachers would want to do it, but anyone who wants to become a writer doesn't need them to. They'll learn other ways.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wickett View Post
    I would like to think that teachers would want to do it, but anyone who wants to become a writer doesn't need them to. They'll learn other ways.
    I believe the author of that article is making a broader point. Here, for instance:
    Writing is thinking made manifest. If students cannot think clearly, they will not write well. So in this respect, writing is tangible evidence of critical thinking or the lack of it -- and is a helpful indicator of how students construct knowledge out of information.
    If a history professor expects his students to think like historians, he'll have to train them to write like historians. I took the author to mean that the former goal entails the latter goal, that you can't choose the former but leave the latter to others.


  6. #6
    Senior Member John Oberon's Avatar
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    I agree that if a person cannot think clearly, he cannot write well. However, I know people who can think clearly, yet cannot write well. Engineers are notoriously awful writers, yet you will not find much clearer thinkers on the planet. So while clear thinking is vital to good writing, good writing is not critical to clear thinking, and bad writing is certainly not iron-clad evidence of unclear thinking. So I disagree with the author. I know a person can have highly developed mental abilities and still be an awful writer.

  7. #7
    Administrator Wickett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Oberon View Post
    I agree that if a person cannot think clearly, he cannot write well. However, I know people who can think clearly, yet cannot write well. Engineers are notoriously awful writers, yet you will not find much clearer thinkers on the planet. So while clear thinking is vital to good writing, good writing is not critical to clear thinking, and bad writing is certainly not iron-clad evidence of unclear thinking. So I disagree with the author. I know a person can have highly developed mental abilities and still be an awful writer.
    Sometimes I like to use big words I don't fully understand just to make myself sound more photosynthesis.

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