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  1. #11
    Rogue Mutt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smiling Curmudgeon View Post
    Mutt,

    I believe you when you say first-person present is huge in YA.

    Do you believe YA is the entire universe of fiction?

    Did you see something about YA I missed in the OPs post? The OP is writing a post-apocalyptic tale. Do you believe the preponderance of post-apoc is in first-person present?

    I love post-apoc novels. Have ready a great many. Perhaps some were written in first-person present. I guarantee you, though, there were few, if any.

    We're having a needless discussion. The fact is, most novels are not written in first-person present. Do you agree? If not, why not?

    If the OP's tale is aimed at YA, it's possible that first-person present is a good way to go. But first-person present is very difficult to pull off.

    The reason we're here is to try to help those who post.

    Is that why you're here?

    Cur
    I would wager that Prongsy's book is YA. If not it should be; that's where the money is. That and romance.

    I don't know why you and John think it's difficult. As someone who's written 4 novels in first-person present tense I didn't find it that difficult. 3 of those 4 are my bestselling books to date, so it's worked pretty well for me, lol. (And no those aren't YA.) The multiple narrators thing would be far more difficult to pull off than the first-person present tense itself.

    Anyway, sorry to point out your ignorance about one of the largest book franchises in history, lol.



  2. #12
    Junior Member
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    Sep 2013
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    So, I guess my original post wasn't very clear. I have two main characters, but one narrator. I will probably switch to the second narrator briefly, but only for a couple of chapters. I also meant that first-person present tense feels like the narrator is being nostalgic.

    I also read a lot, and I've noticed a trend toward first-person present in YA and in some contemporary fiction, I just didn't want everyone to think that was the reason I was choosing it. I usually write in third-person.

    My big problem with the story so far is that it tends to drag. Not really because of the narcissistic reasons, but more because my character get reflective. I like that about him, and it's part of his personality, but it slows down the story a bit.

    My story is.... undefined if it's YA or not. I usually write YA and the characters are in their late teens.... so... probably.

    I might just post that bit for critique. I like to think I can take constructive criticism... at least if I can't, I'll just bitch to my husband. I just need to pick a passage....

  3. #13
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    I did post under the writing critiques section. Thread is entitled "The Fall".

  4. #14
    Rogue Mutt
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prongsy's Girl View Post
    So, I guess my original post wasn't very clear. I have two main characters, but one narrator. I will probably switch to the second narrator briefly, but only for a couple of chapters. I also meant that first-person present tense feels like the narrator is being nostalgic.

    I also read a lot, and I've noticed a trend toward first-person present in YA and in some contemporary fiction, I just didn't want everyone to think that was the reason I was choosing it. I usually write in third-person.

    My big problem with the story so far is that it tends to drag. Not really because of the narcissistic reasons, but more because my character get reflective. I like that about him, and it's part of his personality, but it slows down the story a bit.

    My story is.... undefined if it's YA or not. I usually write YA and the characters are in their late teens.... so... probably.

    I might just post that bit for critique. I like to think I can take constructive criticism... at least if I can't, I'll just bitch to my husband. I just need to pick a passage....
    It would be confusing if you write most of the book with one character's point of view and then just randomly switch to another point of view. Not recommended.

  5. #15
    Senior Member John Oberon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prongsy's Girl View Post
    So, I guess my original post wasn't very clear. I have two main characters, but one narrator. I will probably switch to the second narrator briefly, but only for a couple of chapters. I also meant that first-person present tense feels like the narrator is being nostalgic.

    I also read a lot, and I've noticed a trend toward first-person present in YA and in some contemporary fiction, I just didn't want everyone to think that was the reason I was choosing it. I usually write in third-person.

    My big problem with the story so far is that it tends to drag. Not really because of the narcissistic reasons, but more because my character get reflective. I like that about him, and it's part of his personality, but it slows down the story a bit.

    My story is.... undefined if it's YA or not. I usually write YA and the characters are in their late teens.... so... probably.

    I might just post that bit for critique. I like to think I can take constructive criticism... at least if I can't, I'll just bitch to my husband. I just need to pick a passage....
    Yeah, gotta watch that. Gets annoying real fast when the MC intrudes with an extensive take on every little thing. Gotta rein that in.

  6. #16
    Member Lawrence Tabak's Avatar
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    A couple thoughts: Don't worry about what's au courant, focus on what is right for your story and right for you as a writer. First person anything can be challenging. Vera had to pull Vladimir's only copy of Lolita out of the flames because he found it so technically challenging (such as being limited in describing action outside of your narrator's vision). But then all good writing is challenging, so proceed apace.

    Secondly, just my casual observance -- this is not a critique site that is particularly kind to writers, particularly beginning writers. I've seen plenty of good advice here, but it is not always parsed in a sensitive manner, so be prepared.

  7. #17
    Junior Member
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    I envision making that switch, but if I can't do it without damaging the narrative, I won't do it. It occurs at a junction point in the story when the MC's are separated. Some pretty important things happen when the secondary MC is away from the narrator and I'm trying to avoid a lengthy "this is what happened" dialogue.

    I can usually take some harsh criticism. My day job is in customer service, so I get treated like crap without advice on a daily basis. The only thing that hurts these days is straight-up flaming, which I like to think won't happen here.

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