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Thread: Going Back

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hatchnet View Post
    Okay, do I've decided against looking for a critique for now and concentrate on telling the story. It's been a month since my last post and I'm now approaching 50K words. I'm now using Scrivener which really suits me because I can break the story up into bite sized chunks rather than trying to work with a monster manuscript. I'm the kind of guy that thinks up missing bits as I go and it's great to have a tool which makes it easy to manage that process. I'm also finding it good for keeping track of the story timeline. Anyway, happy writing all. Happy New Year.
    WOOOOOO! 50K That's awesome! Keep going and do what you are doing - don't worry about critiques till you have the full story down. Self-confidence is everything. If you're 50k in, you have a story with legs. Do whatever feels best to you. I hope you finish and have all the good stuff to shape into the story you envision. If I was to give you any suggestions, you might try writing the end scenes after you have the first parts down. Writing end scenes will give you a guidepost to shoot for. Also, like you said, dealing in chunks is important so you envision scenes and chapters and what you are trying to communicate within each, instead of thinking of the whole huge thing ALL the time. I would suggest picking up SAVE THE CAT by Blake Snyder. It's a screenwriting book but it helped me to see how stories are best broken up into chunks (scenes), and it also shows how to use dramatic structure within the chunks. Anyway, GOOD LUCK. Write that thing so I can read it.



  2. #22
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    Thanks Diem,

    In fact, I have already written the ending though it needs some work and read "Save the cat" last year, a great read.

    Appreciate the encouraging words

    Back to the keyboard

  3. #23
    Senior Member John Oberon's Avatar
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    Hey, looks like "no plan, just write" is working great for you. Keep up the good work.

  4. #24
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    Okay, so this is a vent against myself. I am stuck in a procrastination bog. It is muddy and gluey, there is mist and evil things in the darkness of the willows which reach to the ground to brush against my face and tangle my feet. A sign on the path which leads into the gloom has a message "Google Procrastination" it points to a hovel in a small clearing. A dead cat by the side of the path is so odorous that my stomach heaves in disgust. Nevertheless, I move on. The knocker on the door is the image of he main character in the book I am writing. Reddish hair, stubble, he grins at me with dirty teeth and dead eyes. I knock and almost before I have wiped the slime from the door on my smelly green tee-shirt, the door opens. A small girl, pink dress, pointed teeth and pale white skin, shiny with perspiration in the gloom looks at me and smiles. "I have wireless" The voice is thin and old. I look closer and she pokes her tongue out at me. The room is small. The windows, coated with moss let in little light. A terminal in the corner provides a ray of hope in the dim room. The girl pulls a chair back and grins again, yellowed teeth glinting in the glare from the screen. "Google is the answer" she whispers mischievously. There is no hope, I must procrastinate while the heroes of my story look around in bewilderment at their lack of direction and activity.

  5. #25
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    The keyboard is grubby. Like an evil grin with a missing tooth, the backspace key is missing. There is no going back. The girl breaths over my shoulder, fetid breath ruffling the hairs on the back of my neck. Shuddering, I type the magic word "procrastination"

    The screen darkens adding to the gloom. The girl has gone and a list of games appear on the screen. Beside me is a box with paint and brushes, cooking books and my guitar. The Facebook icon blinks enticingly in the corner of the screen. A glance out of the window shows the forest gone, replaced with a beach and a bar.

    A cell has appeared in the corner of the room, its rusted bars are thick and the interior is gloomy. Two of the characters from my book sit on the single bed. They are dressed in suits and suglasses. "Don't leave us" The tall one says. "You give us life" The shorter one simple stares impassively at me.

  6. #26
    Senior Member John Oberon's Avatar
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    Puh-lease...have you so soon forgotten what I wrote at the beginning of this thread? People become enamored of the idea of authorship all the time. They conjure scenarios of fame, fortune, and glamor, and it goads them into writing a few tens of pages, maybe over a hundred, but then they lose steam. Nobody's fighting to buy the rights to whatever you're writing, or clamoring for an interview, or flashing cameras at you, or...anything. It's just you and the keyboard and nobody pushing you at all. It's work, hard, persistent work that's not done until it's done.

    When you sit at the keyboard, it's not Google or fantasy figures stopping you from writing. It's just you...all you. You decide not to write. Maybe you don't verbalize it, but your actions speak loud and clear:

    "I do not want to write. I do not want to be an author. This sucks! I want to play my little boy games on the internet, look at some videos, chat, maybe some porn, some news, some funny pictures, some music, some jokes, any kind of chewing gum for my mind, because I do not want to write. It requires too much effort, it's too hard, and if this is what authorship is like, then I DO NOT WANT TO BE A DAMN AUTHOR!"

    That's what you're saying, and more importantly, what you're doing, so quit whining. Just admit it and quit.

    Or don't. You're Rocky and your book is Apollo Creed, and you're going to do what it takes to win.

    Be a net-head or be an author, but stop pretending your "procrastination" isn't an intentional decision on your part. We do what we want to do; we don't do what we don't want to do. You're doing what you want to do, whether you like to admit it or not.

    Choose. Make a decision. Then stick with it, dammit. Get writing or get lost. Don't need any whining non-writers darkening the forums.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Gilfindel's Avatar
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    Actually, I was enjoying the rather creative descriptions of the things that distract us from the work at hand. I myself have been guilty many times of playing "just one more game" when I should have been completing something more useful (or just getting caught up on sleep). The fact that Hatch actually sat down to write about his inability to write is rather ironic. He's writing, just not about the things he should be working on. That's not whining, it's clearing his head.

  8. #28
    Administrator Wickett's Avatar
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    John you make a good point but I think you took it too literally. Have you ever heard of random typing? It is nothing but what comes to your mind at the time with no forethought what so ever. It's just to vent and clear your mind. This also reminds me of the Infinite Monkey Theorem.

  9. #29
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    Okay I was frustratingly stuck with a piece of story that got out of control. I was just rambling while toying with ideas.

  10. #30
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    Now I have to finish this piece or it will be left hanging....

    My hand reaches for the mouse as I settle. Behind me a rasping voice calls out. "Wait". Looking over my shoulder I see the tall man in the sunglasses gripping the bars to his cell with nicotine stained fingers. Jake. I gave him life. "Look in the top drawer" he pleads.

    Turning back I examine the desk. It is old and worn . Someone has carved procrastinate in Gothic lettering near the mouse-pad . There are two drawers. The left one has a signed copy of the Magician. Feist has written on the cover "Think of how long this takes, do you really want to do this?
    " behind me rasps the voice again "The other drawer " the voice has an edge of desperation.


    There is a key. "Let us out" the voice behind me is like my conscience. Persuasive.
    I pick it up and glance at the screen again. "Please" that voice again.
    A faint vibration distracts. The phone in my pocket. I stand so I can retrieve it. The girl appears at my shoulder. "Don't answer it" she grumbles in an impossibly low voice "it's not for you"


    A spark of defiance wells up from within and I press the answer key
    "This is John Oberon you sniveling whiner" the voice screams down the phone like a living thing. I can almost see the spittle spraying out of the phone
    "Get back to work and free your characters before they die you lazy sack of ****. You start a story, you have to finish it. Now get to work before I reach down this line and slap you"


    Cowed, I let the two men out of their cage. The short tough one looks up at me, my face reflected in his sunglasses. "Finish the story, don't let me down"


    The computer has lost all the game icons, the weather outside is grey and dreary. The Magician has vanished and the only icon on the screen is for Scrivener. A coffee steams gently next to the computer. Sitting down, I wake my characters from their slumber. I have been cruel to them and now it's time to make them dance.
    Last edited by Hatchnet; 02-04-2014 at 03:58 PM.

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