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  1. #11
    Senior Member Gilfindel's Avatar
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    Lol, I have absolutely no interest in either zombies or vampires, especially the latter. They've been done to death (so to speak), to the point that any mention of them in a story immediately puts me off. I'll be creating something new, I hope.



  2. #12
    Administrator Wickett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gilfindel View Post
    Lol, I have absolutely no interest in either zombies or vampires, especially the latter. They've been done to death (so to speak), to the point that any mention of them in a story immediately puts me off. I'll be creating something new, I hope.
    I never understood the fascination with vampires at all. Nice pun by the way.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gilfindel View Post
    All good stories should have relatable characters, so that the reader can become immersed in the tale. For a horror story, I suspect the more effective ones rely on the slow building of tension (as opposed to "boo!" moments, which frankly don't work all that well in print), along with a continued sense of mystery. If the reader knows what's going on, then there's no tension, but the clues have to be there, building the picture up bit by bit until the final climax.
    I agree. Sounds like you already know what makes a good horror story, but bear in mind that different readers are fans of different types. And there's nothing wrong with "Boo" moments (if you're referring to a quick little scare), as long as that's not all your story is about, IMO. One of my favorite scenes in King's Salem's Lot is when the female protag is creeping up to a house: "And she knew someone was behind her even before the hand fell on her shoulder."

    Nothing wrong with vampire stories either (IMO), as long as they're horror stories and well-written. Most vampire novels now are more romance than horror (nothing wrong with that either, if that's what you like). But I'll wager that if Stephen King or Robert McCammon or F Paul Wilson wrote another vampire novel, even people who are "tired" of vampire stories would be hooked again, lol.

    Good Luck!!!
    Last edited by The Tinman; 10-03-2013 at 08:56 PM.

  4. #14
    Administrator Wickett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Tinman View Post
    I agree. Sounds like you already know what makes a good horror story, but bear in mind that different readers are fans of different types. And there's nothing wrong with "Boo" moments (if you're referring to a quick little scare), as long as that's not all your story is about, IMO. One of my favorite scenes in King's Salem's Lot is when the female protag is creeping up to a house: "And she knew someone was behind her even before the hand fell on her shoulder."

    Nothing wrong with vampire stories either (IMO), as long as they're horror stories and well-written. Most vampire novels now are more romance than horror (nothing wrong with that either, if that's what you like). But I'll wager that if Stephen King or Robert McCammon or F Paul Wilson wrote another vampire novel, even people who are "tired" of vampire stories would be hooked again, lol.

    Good Luck!!!
    Vampire stories are not inherently bad, it's that they've become so mainstream (especially here recently) that writing a vampire related novel will land you in the same giant pool as everyone else. Even if your work is good, it will be difficult to make it stand out and get noticed.

  5. #15
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    The real problem, as I understand it, is that there is no market for 'horror'. Literary agents now look for 'supernatural'.

    To me horror works best as a psychological thriller. The most memorable, other than Stephan King, leave most of the horror part to your imagination. Leave out the indecisive whining scream queen too , please.

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