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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    Finding an Editor

    I'm sure this is a common theme for new writes - "I can't afford editor".

    And I'm sure the common reply is, "You can't afford NOT to have an editor!"

    So for those of us who don't have $1,000 to throw after something that may or not ever generate that kind of income - any advice? Is there such a thing as a legitimate writer's proofreading exchange?

    There must be so many authors out there who run into this obstacle.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    One solution is to find critique partners. You trade your work with another writer and provide him feedback in exchange for his feedback. A lot of people post requests for critique partners on the Agent Query and QueryTracker forums. You could start there. Be aware, though, that a good critique partner should do more than proofread. You want someone who will look at such things as POV, plot development, sentence structure and flow, etc.

    In general, a critique partner won't take your work to the same level as a professional editor, but it's a good start. Proofreading is only a tiny function of good editing. A professional editor will help you with story development, spelling, syntax, grammar, POV, dialogue, narrative, the use of metaphor and simile, and more. All of that takes expertise and lots of time--time to read the work carefully, time to possibly remap the storyline, time to analyze the writer's use of language, etc. That's why a professional editor isn't free.

    Jeanne

  3. #3
    Rogue Mutt
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    I think Oberon charges $30 an hour. Go hit him up.

  4. #4
    Senior Member John Oberon's Avatar
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    Good grief, have you been asleep during this horrible Obama economy, Mutt? Prices have risen considerably. It's $40/hour now.

    Anyway, Matthew's looking NOT to pay. I agree with Jeanne, Matthew. I think you look for a person whose writing you admire, who you're convinced knows what they're talking about when it comes to writing. They can clearly explain to you why something is good or bad in writing. Or...perhaps you become a writing team. As they say, two heads are better than one.

  5. #5
    Rogue Mutt
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Oberon View Post
    Good grief, have you been asleep during this horrible Obama economy, Mutt? Prices have risen considerably. It's $40/hour now.
    Horrible economy? You realize the stock market just hit record highs and unemployment is at 5-year lows? You might need to reinvest your 401K if it's not making any money.

  6. #6
    Senior Member John Oberon's Avatar
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    But what is the money worth, Mutt? Why do you think everyone's running to gold, silver, and other commodities? What difference does it make if you have a whole lot of nothing?

    I mean, I suppose there's an advantage to it because I'm paying off loans with cheap money, but man...I look at Greece and Spain, and it's like the Democrats say, "Yeah! That's the way America should go!" They're implementing more government spending, more taxes, more, more, more, just when we should be saying "Whoa!"
    Last edited by John Oberon; 05-13-2013 at 10:25 AM.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeanne Gassman View Post
    One solution is to find critique partners. You trade your work with another writer and provide him feedback in exchange for his feedback. A lot of people post requests for critique partners on the Agent Query and QueryTracker forums. You could start there. Be aware, though, that a good critique partner should do more than proofread. You want someone who will look at such things as POV, plot development, sentence structure and flow, etc.

    In general, a critique partner won't take your work to the same level as a professional editor, but it's a good start. Proofreading is only a tiny function of good editing. A professional editor will help you with story development, spelling, syntax, grammar, POV, dialogue, narrative, the use of metaphor and simile, and more. All of that takes expertise and lots of time--time to read the work carefully, time to possibly remap the storyline, time to analyze the writer's use of language, etc. That's why a professional editor isn't free.

    Jeanne
    I like the thought of having a fellow writer look over your work. It would be an excellent way to get some good insight for what your story or book needs.

  8. #8
    Junior Member
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    Sep 2014
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    My aunt tried out a proofreader that she was thrilled with! It won't let me post the URL but the website is Professional Book Proofreading .com, I have it in my notes for my own reference. My aunt had the manuscript back within a week or two and said she couldn't have been happier with the service. My theory is if you cannot afford an editor, get it as close as you can and spring for a good and reasonably priced proofreader! Good luck and happy writing!

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