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  1. #11
    Member Lawrence Tabak's Avatar
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    While as a writer I'm always interested in dialogue, I will add another voice. I don't know, and I'm sure Rogue can't know without sending his own work to the same agent and getting rejected, if this was a standard rejection or a tweaked one. Whether it matters is a more interesting question. I recently had a manuscript with an agent for five months, with three extensive phone conversations and two rewrites, only to have him step away. Is this "better" than a straightforward rejection letter or simply more tortuous? Ultimately I believe you should only focus on things you can control -- putting maximum effort into writing the best book you can. Getting competent advice from careful, experienced readers is certainly a part of this process. Getting insulted is not. My apologies on behalf of the board to Debbi.



  2. #12
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    Thank you, Lawrence. .

  3. #13
    Rogue Mutt
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    Would you like to apologize to me on behalf of the board too?

    Something similar to this happened somewhere else recently. I noted someone had posted the cover of their new self-published book. The cover used the exact same picture of a book written by someone who posted here (or used to at any rate, which is the only reason I knew about her book). So I point out to the "indie" author that her cover has already been used. What's she do? Not say, Hey thanks for saving me from looking like a real jackass by going around with a plagiarized cover. No, it's all Ooh you're so negative I'm not going to let you bring me down, blah blah blah. Like I'm the bad guy because I wanted to save her some embarrassment--and also to respect the work of another author.

    I guess people are so wimpy these days that they can't stand anything that even faintly resembles criticism. So I'm not allowed to say, "Hey, someone else already used that cover!" or "Um, yeah, that's a form rejection." No, I'm just supposed to say, "You go girl!" (Or something less 1997-sounding.)

    Incidentally, to come full circle, this kind of coddling is why agencies put "your query stood out" in their form letter, so these milk sops will get a warm fuzzy.

    So anyway, I'm sorry. You go, Debbi! What a great rejection! The next one will be the one for sure!

    Quote Originally Posted by Lawrence Tabak View Post
    While as a writer I'm always interested in dialogue, I will add another voice. I don't know, and I'm sure Rogue can't know without sending his own work to the same agent and getting rejected, if this was a standard rejection or a tweaked one. Whether it matters is a more interesting question. I recently had a manuscript with an agent for five months, with three extensive phone conversations and two rewrites, only to have him step away. Is this "better" than a straightforward rejection letter or simply more tortuous? Ultimately I believe you should only focus on things you can control -- putting maximum effort into writing the best book you can. Getting competent advice from careful, experienced readers is certainly a part of this process. Getting insulted is not. My apologies on behalf of the board to Debbi.

  4. #14
    Senior Member John Oberon's Avatar
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    I agree with Mutt that it was a rejection, but disagree with his attitude. Don't know how you face life with that grinding negativism, Mutt.

    Most likely, it was a form letter, but I've known agents who employ several kinds of form letters. They send a terse, perfunctory letter to awful writers they hope never to hear from again, a standard letter to average writers, and a complimentary letter to writers they'd like to hear from again. Yours appears to be of that variety. Or maybe it's their only form letter they send to everyone. At the very least, it's certainly encouraging and positive, and indicates, at least superficially, the kind of people THEY are. If it's a form letter, it's a good one, because it doesn't read like one - they took some time to develop it and make it appear personal. For myself, I like people who deal with me in a kind, polite, and positive way, even if it is a form letter.

    I'm with you, Debbie. It's a better rejection than the standard fare, and in my opinion, one meant to encourage you. On to the next rejection...to acceptance or bust!

  5. #15
    Rogue Mutt
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    I don't know how you can survive in this industry without negativism. Just go read Writer Beware sometime and see how many scummy people there are in publishing looking to take advantage of naive people like Debbi. The sooner you start to see through the tricks and lies, the better.

    Quote Originally Posted by John Oberon View Post
    I agree with Mutt that it was a rejection, but disagree with his attitude. Don't know how you face life with that grinding negativism, Mutt.

    Most likely, it was a form letter, but I've known agents who employ several kinds of form letters. They send a terse, perfunctory letter to awful writers they hope never to hear from again, a standard letter to average writers, and a complimentary letter to writers they'd like to hear from again. Yours appears to be of that variety. Or maybe it's their only form letter they send to everyone. At the very least, it's certainly encouraging and positive, and indicates, at least superficially, the kind of people THEY are. If it's a form letter, it's a good one, because it doesn't read like one - they took some time to develop it and make it appear personal. For myself, I like people who deal with me in a kind, polite, and positive way, even if it is a form letter.

    I'm with you, Debbie. It's a better rejection than the standard fare, and in my opinion, one meant to encourage you. On to the next rejection...to acceptance or bust!

  6. #16
    Senior Member
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    Rogue. You make me laugh. Lol

    Keep going. It's very entertaining. What makes me laugh more than anything is your obvious assumption that I'm a young, green newbie. I wish! Lol

    There's a saying here in England. Dont teach your Grandmother to suck eggs. Look it up.


    Hey John, thanks for your support v

    Debbi

  7. #17
    Rogue Mutt
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    Old people can be the most naive. That's why they get suckered out of their money so often. You can't have been at it for very long to get excited over something like this. The time to get excited is when they ask for a partial or a full, or certainly if they offer you representation. Otherwise it's just another NO.

  8. #18
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    Lol. You're a real miserable sod!

    You always make yourself look so bad on here. What starts as an inoffensive post by anyone always gets turned into something poison by you.

    You must be so unhappy.

  9. #19
    Administrator Wickett's Avatar
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    This is going no where, but personal.

    Topic locked.

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