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  1. #21
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    I have a buddy who buys wine at Big Lots. She swears she gets the best wine there, for very little money. Wine from all around the world.

    I understand that studies show it is actually good for you to drink wine. Aren't there even wine pills now? Supplements?



  2. #22
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    Yeah, exposition and expostulation do have different dictionary definitions. I've never heard anyone use expostulate for what Gary was describing, but he was drinking wine and I was falling asleep, so I wasn't sure.

    In screenplay writing, we talk about exposition all the time. In this case, it seemed to me to be the right word, too, for presenting backstory in this instance. That's why I asked. But, in writing novels, we also talk about info-dumping, which is frequently what happens with backstory, and then it's not such a good thing.

    Can't hurt to ask, right? Except sometimes you ask what you think is a harmless question and wind up in a brawl, so maybe it can hurt to ask.

    I don't know. I'm still sleepy. And now I want to try Yellowtail Shiraz just because I like the name, even though it'll give me a terrible headache.
    Last edited by leslee; 02-29-2012 at 08:20 AM.

  3. #23
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    I always associate expostulate with postulate. When you postulate, you present a proposition or idea. When you expostulate, you present points against the proposition. That's my take anyway.

  4. #24
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    v. ex·pos·tu·lat·ed , ex·pos·tu·lat·ing , ex·pos·tu·lates
    v. intr. To reason earnestly with someone in an effort to dissuade or correct; remonstrate. See Synonyms at object.

    v. tr. To say in protest; object: "[He] expostulated that they had every right to hold a street meeting" (Pierre Berton).

    http://ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=EXPOSTULATE

  5. #25
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    Uh . . . okay.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary Kessler View Post
    I haven't gotten a lay recently, so....
    Uh-oh?

    (I believe I gave an example of uptalk.)

    *_*

  7. #27
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    ...and Gary gave an exampled of trash talk.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jena Grace View Post
    v. ex·pos·tu·lat·ed , ex·pos·tu·lat·ing , ex·pos·tu·lates
    v. intr. To reason earnestly with someone in an effort to dissuade or correct; remonstrate. See Synonyms at object.

    v. tr. To say in protest; object: "[He] expostulated that they had every right to hold a street meeting" (Pierre Berton).

    http://ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=EXPOSTULATE
    Yeah, that's how I think of it.

  9. #29
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    Right, jayce...and way too much information.

    *_*

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by John Oberon View Post
    I always associate expostulate with postulate. When you postulate, you present a proposition or idea. When you expostulate, you present points against the proposition. That's my take anyway.
    The Latin prefix ex- does not mean against but out of or from.

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