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  1. #1
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    100 year old kitchen.

    Member of my writing group wants description of unique kitchen. Do you think this is necessary?



  2. #2
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    JUST MY OPINION, FEEL FREE TO IGNORE:

    I don't quite understand your question. Is the member of your writing group asking you to provide the details of a 100 year old kitchen in your writing? Is that what you're saying?

    If that's the case:

    First, you might want to provide the paragraph or page here so we can get an idea if it seems like a description of the kitchen would be valuable to the work.

    Second, whether or not it's actually "necessary" is your call. The writer decides what is or isn't necessary.

    But without seeing the page or paragraph, it's pretty hard for us to know if it would enhance the work.

    Or maybe that isn't your question at all. Is it?

  3. #3
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    Earlier I mentioned that the house in Princeton is 100 years old and charming.

    Yes, I think it's a good suggestion to include description. Is what I've written awkward? Sorry, I'm just getting used to new Writer's Net (still like old one better, but I'll adjust) and don't think I pasted following in first post.

    After dinner Rhonda and I were doing dishes in the kitchen, where state-of-the- art stainless-steel kitchen appliances enhanced rather than clashed with the one hundred year old antique cabinetry. Casually, she began to discuss what I knew my whole family felt. “Carla, you don’t owe me an explanation. I can certainly see how happy you are and Nick looks like a wonderful man. But perhaps you just want to think of this period as a leave of absence from your occupation until you’re settled in. You’re somewhat young to retire, don’t you think?”

  4. #4
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    After dinner Rhonda and I were doing dishes in the kitchen, where state-of-the- art stainless-steel kitchen appliances enhanced rather than clashed with the one hundred year old antique cabinetry.

    Yes, it is awkward. And lacks proper punctuation.

    So, the person in your writing group wants a detailed description of the kitchen? Do you think that's important to the reader?
    Last edited by leslee; 02-13-2012 at 12:12 PM.

  5. #5
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    I think it helps define Rhonda whose taste and judgment is important later in the story.

  6. #6
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    Well, that's great. You've answered your own question. You feel it would be valuable to your storyline. So, go ahead and write the description and see how you feel about it. Do some research first and be sure you know what a 100 year old kitchen looks like, what might be on the walls, etc. If you're going to describe it, be accurate. And it doesn't take a lot to provide a visual image for the reader. It could be just a couple of sentences, if that's all you want to add.

  7. #7
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    What leslee said, plus:

    —"antique" is redundant, since you've already said it was 100 years old.

    —hyphenate "one hundred year old" cabinetry.

    —because you're writing in first person POV, your narrator can only speak to what she knows or sees (e.g., "stainless steel" is visually apparent; that the appliances were purchased on layaway from Sears, she might not know); her opinions, of course, are fair game.

    HTH.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Lea Zalas's Avatar
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    BW, I'm sure you can find pictures of old kitchens on the web.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Book Werm View Post
    Earlier I mentioned that the house in Princeton is 100 years old and charming.

    Yes, I think it's a good suggestion to include description. Is what I've written awkward? Sorry, I'm just getting used to new Writer's Net (still like old one better, but I'll adjust) and don't think I pasted following in first post.

    After dinner Rhonda and I were doing dishes in the kitchen, where state-of-the- art stainless-steel kitchen appliances enhanced rather than clashed with the one hundred year old antique cabinetry. Casually, she began to discuss what I knew my whole family felt. “Carla, you don’t owe me an explanation. I can certainly see how happy you are and Nick looks like a wonderful man. But perhaps you just want to think of this period as a leave of absence from your occupation until you’re settled in. You’re somewhat young to retire, don’t you think?”
    Is the contrast in kitchen appliances going to have a role in the plotline? If not, there's no reason to mention them at all. There's no reason to mention anything about the kitchen unless it has a role in the plot or to illustrate character.

  10. #10
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    Write in all the information you want. You can always delete it later.

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