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  1. #1
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    Better way of saying.

    Is this confusing? A non-sequitur? I mean to say that her difficulties haven't derailed her from nomination to sainthood.



    For a woman who is almost a saint, Dolly has not had an easy life.



  2. #2
    Senior Member C Bets's Avatar
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    Do you mean literally, or a figure of speech when calling her "almost a saint?"
    Cindy

    And be at peace... the universe is unfolding as it should

  3. #3
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    First—without knowing the context—"easy life" is vague. Same with "almost a saint" (what C Bets said). Taken literally, yes, it comes across as a non-sequitur. I don't see a negative relation between nomination to sainthood and not an easy life; if anything, deprivation and hardships in this life might ease the path to sainthood. (Guessin' here, since I'm not in that line of work, picking saints.)

  4. #4
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    I remember there being only a handful of saints. In the Catholic religion, there are now over 10,000, or some outrageous number. Everybody wants to get into the act.

    http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_many_Saints_are_there

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  5. #5
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    I don't think it's very good analogy. Saints are renown for having difficult lives.

  6. #6
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    Unless BW meant to say, "As a woman who is almost a saint, Dolly has not had an easy life."

    But that would mean the narrator, or somebody, is judging Dolly to be worthy of being such a creature. And how would anyone really know a thing like that? If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, quacks like a duck, it could be a kangaroo.

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  7. #7
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    Figuratively.

    I mean that life's hard knocks haven't trarnished her and she remains an unusually good and loving person. Any suggestions.

  8. #8
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    Maybe there's no need for you to bring in the saint bit. The "is"sounds like it's a given she's a candidate for sainthood, but you say she's not. "For a woman who is almost a saint, Dolly has not had an easy life."

    I too had a lot of hard knocks in my past, and yet I think of myself as an optimistic and a good person. There are many of us "survivors" around. I'd barf if somebody compared me to a saint.

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  9. #9
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    Sainthood

    So does this make more sense:

    Dolly has a truly magnanimous nature. This and her difficult life are difficult enough to qualify her for sainthood.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Book Werm View Post
    So does this make more sense:

    Dolly has a truly magnanimous nature. This and her difficult life are difficult enough to qualify her for sainthood.
    It makes sense, but it has that dreaded doubling of a word almost back to back (difficult).

    Why not something like: Dolly has a truly magnanimous nature, which, considering the difficult life she's led, is enough to qualify her for sainthood.

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