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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emily MacGowan View Post
    A quick google of "African Adventures of Alyssa" will show you that Sunyana is, indeed, real.
    I (and I think many of us) already knew she had a book out there; she's the real deal all right. Have you clicked into the SNEAK PEEK area?

    http://www.buybooksontheweb.com/prod...=0-7414-6619-8

    *_*



  2. #22
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    A quick google of "African Adventures of Alyssa" will show you that Sunyana is, indeed, real.

    Depends on what you mean by "real."

  3. #23
    Senior Member C Bets's Avatar
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    Read the "sneak peek" and it will be crystal clear.
    Cindy

    And be at peace... the universe is unfolding as it should

  4. #24
    Visiting Tralfamadore
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    Don't ever stop trying, Sunayna. You can take creative writing classes online, but probably the best tips you'll get from me are to not rely upon one source when you need help with your writing dilemmas. You've indicated your desire to rewrite paragraphs and this in of itself tells me you're aware of your weaknesses. I've always thought of some of my weaknesses as obstacles or challenges and with my stubborn nature to overcome them, those weaknesses have often become my strengths.

    Good luck.

  5. #25
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    Read the "sneak peek" and it will be crystal clear.

    I read it. Nothing became any clearer for me.

    My issue was never that someone hadn't published a poorly written book. I had no doubt it was true. It happens every day!

    What I questioned was the sincerity of her effort to improve her writing, given that she has posted the same request repeatedly - basically hoping that we fix her work for her - but ignores the advice, examples, information, etc., that have been provided to her.

    That's the frustration for those of us who try to help a writer with something more specific than just the encouragement to never stop writing. When a writer expresses the desire to improve, then ignores every suggestion that would lead to improvement, you wonder why you bother to try, and why they continue to ask. Actually doing the hard work of learning to write would be "real."

    It's the crying wolf that wears out those of us who have made an effort to help. There are several of us who would be delighted to help a writer sincerely making the effort to improve. We've done it plenty of times. We've tried to do it with her as well.

    She has the right to post the same request five hundred times on WN if that is what she wants to do. But expecting people to do her work for her is unrealistic.
    Last edited by leslee; 11-10-2011 at 06:25 AM.

  6. #26
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    I just started reading Gregor the Overlander today. It's a little old, but the writing is very engaging. How does that sound to study the craft of writing? I also bookmarked some creative writing courses. So I am going to change my attitude and listen to every piece advice given, examples, and information as much as possible. I have my mom's kindle app and she has some MG novels on it.

  7. #27
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    Read 100 MG books and then try again.

    I'm not joking. ONE. HUNDRED. Until you are extremely well-versed in your genre, you shouldn't even attempt to write it.

    PS I am much, much older than you, and published, and I still read a minimum of a book a week.

  8. #28
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    Reading is important to learning to write. And I hope you find a class that is right for you.

  9. #29
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    I think I could read Gregor the Overlander in a week. I'm actually enjoying it. Yes, I will take a break from my writing, but I may still do some writing exercises to help improve it.

  10. #30
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    I think I could read Gregor the Overlander in a week.
    The idea is not to see how fast you can read. The idea is to study as you read, to observe how the author opens a scene, establishes a character, moves the story.

    And that's my last piece of advice.

    Good luck.

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