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  1. #11
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    I personally like switching POV, and I've seen it done well by various authors, both as 3rd person, and as multiple first person. My own novel-in-progress is multiple 1st person. (I gave examples of good novels with multiple 1st-person in the last thread I started.) Like Emily said, I think the POV shifts should be marked by separate chapters.
    Last edited by Gaylen Moore; 11-08-2011 at 11:19 AM.



  2. #12
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    POV (yes, the 'cool term' for point of view) isn't so bad, at least from my perspective. At times I actually like the added dimension of it as long as its done well.

  3. #13
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    So I wonder why TV shows and movies can easily get away with head-hopping or switching POVs.

  4. #14
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    Apples and grapefruit. Visual arts are multidimensional (writing arts aren't--except for those old children's sniff and feel--and, sometimes, listen to canned sounds--books) and film arts don't get into thoughts at all--unless, on rare occasion, when they include a narrator speaking a character's thoughts. There may be a few cases where narrators are speaking more than one character's thoughts in a single film, but I'd be surprised if you could name an instance. Headhoppy is mostly irrelevant in TV/movie films. You aren't in a TV/movie character's head. You see what they do and you listen to what they say and to what other's say about them--and you figure out what they are thinking from this. This isn't headhopping.

    I'm afraid you are exhibiting mutiple and multidimensional examples of not getting it, Sunaya. Once again, you appear to be grossly out of your depth. And once again, I suggest you stop taking us for a ride here and go back to square one and learn from the bottom up--for ourself, not by using others as a crutch.

  5. #15
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    Sorry about that. I was just curious.

  6. #16
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    I have to agree with Gaylen, I like reading books that switch points of view. Some of Stephen King's books switch view for a paragraph or two, and I doubt that anyone but fellow writers or editors even notice it was done. Good luck Sunayna!!!

  7. #17
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    Don't mind the changing POV so long as it's written well and the transition is smooth. You'll have a great time learning how to change from 1st to 3rd if you use examples that are available online and elsewhere. Most authors change at the end of a chapter because that's when scenes climax, and it's then that any new or returning characters mesh well with the storyline.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Avonne Writer's Avatar
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    Robin - I was under the assumption we were talking changing "head speak" as in, hopping from one character 1st person to another character 1st person. Not 1st person POV to third. Maybe I was mistaken.

  9. #19
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    Like Avonne, I was not thinking of this thread in terms of switching between 1st and 3rd, but now that you mention it, I would love to hear some discussion of this. My impression is that 1st-to-3rd, or vice versa, is basically always discouraged, but I know of at least one example of a novel that does this: Louise Erdrich's "Love Medicine" changes POV from one character to another, and some of the chapters even switch to 3rd person. The switches are chapter to chapter, never within a chapter. Overall, it reads a lot like a collection of short stories, but all the stories are tied together like novel chapters, so overall it is still a novel. I guess the bottom line is that anything is possible if you are a good enough writer.

    Do any of you know of any other examples of novels that do this?

  10. #20
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    Grafton does this well with her V is for Vendetta novel.

    http://www.amazon.com/V-Vengeance-Ki.../dp/0399157867

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