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  1. #1
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    It's in the news.

    I'm looking for some guidance in writing non-fiction pieces for areas that I've no previous exposure to. Researching the information online is one thing but when there are already several articles on the subject how do you keep yours from being redundant?



  2. #2
    Senior Member C Bets's Avatar
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    I'm confused - why on earth would you want to write any non-fiction piece that you have no knowledge of, and the subject has already saturated the market? Am I misunderstanding your question?
    Cindy

    And be at peace... the universe is unfolding as it should

  3. #3
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    You could go bonkers trying not to be "redundant." It'd be necessary to read every bloody book and article that's ever been published on the subject.

    Methinks Micheal is playing with us.

    *_*

  4. #4
    Senior Member Frank Baron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Micheal Woodruff View Post
    I'm looking for some guidance in writing non-fiction pieces for areas that I've no previous exposure to. Researching the information online is one thing but when there are already several articles on the subject how do you keep yours from being redundant?
    Find a new slant.

  5. #5
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    Thank you Frank. Thats kind of what I was thinking but wasn't sure if it was a good way to go.

    C Bets, to try and clear up any confusion, being new to a certain area doesn't necessarily negate having to write about it. Sometimes that's all there is available for the time being and it wouldn't take long to learn about the topic. It also allows for the mind to be creative with non-fiction in order to put a new spin on things - or new slant as Frank said.

    Hello Kitty,

    sorry, couldn't resist....

    No, I'm not playing with you. It's a legit question. I'm not referring to overly saturated broad topic books and articles but rather fresher pieces or something older sprung anew.

  6. #6
    Senior Member L C's Avatar
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    As a long-time writer of nonfiction, I find that having some knowledge of the subject is greatly helpful.

    But I can also pull an occasional plum out of my ass, in which case redundancy takes a backseat to expediency and a deadline.

    Hope this helps.

  7. #7
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    Well, one thing's for sure...nobody's heard your opinion about whatever the subject is. If you slide a bit from non-fiction into commentary, that opens the door to a lot of different "slants".

  8. #8
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    I've arrived to the discussion a little late, I guess. This is an intriguing topic. My husband is a newspaper reporter and we have several friends who have been laid off from their jobs and now freelance for magazines and journals. They frequently write about topics they were previously unfamiliar with. I'm curious what types of publications you are writing for and whether your pieces must be fact-based or opinion-based. Kitty's point is a good one--there's no way for you to be aware ofeverything that's already been written on a particular subject. I wouldn't worry about redundancy as long as you aren't plagiarizing! Even if the material is already out there, you are potentially bringing it to a new audience.

    My suggestion would be to think like a reporter. "Interview" people who are knowlegeable about the topic. This type of writing can be great, because you can learn about all kinds of things that are new to you. You can become that obnoxious person who knows a little bit about everything!

  9. #9
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    This is an "old" post.

  10. #10
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    Yep, old post, but Montana Chick has a new answer. Doesn't hurt anything.

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