HomeWritersLiterary AgentsEditorsPublishersResourcesDiscussion
Forum Login | Join the discussion
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Rhinebeck, NY
    Posts
    4,623

    "Publishers are terrified"?

    From: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/17/te...authors&st=cse

    "Several large publishers declined to speak on the record about Amazonís efforts. 'Publishers are terrified and donít know what to do,' said Dennis Loy Johnson of Melville House, who is known for speaking his mind.

    'Everyoneís afraid of Amazon,' said Richard Curtis, a longtime agent who is also an e-book publisher. 'If youíre a bookstore, Amazon has been in competition with you for some time. If youíre a publisher, one day you wake up and Amazon is competing with you too. And if youíre an agent, Amazon may be stealing your lunch because it is offering authors the opportunity to publish directly and cut you out.'"

    *_*



  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    736
    I think paradigms are shifting a bit, yes. And mainstream publishers have never been wild about that happening.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Lea Zalas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southern Georgia
    Posts
    1,756
    The key feature about putting your book out there through Amazon: the readers choose what they want to read, not the agents or publishers.

    Unfortunately, as agents and publishers alike cut down the number of new authors they'll take on, they simply hasten their demise that much quicker.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    736
    Quote Originally Posted by Lea Zalas View Post
    The key feature about putting your book out there through Amazon: the readers choose what they want to read, not the agents or publishers.

    Unfortunately, as agents and publishers alike cut down the number of new authors they'll take on, they simply hasten their demise that much quicker.
    What evidence is there that publishers are taking on lower percentages of new authors (percentage of their author lists) than ever before?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Lea Zalas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Southern Georgia
    Posts
    1,756
    Sorry Gary, I need to clarify. According to several well-known agents' blogs, publishers are cutting back on how many books they're publishing each year due to decreasing sales of printed books, especially paperbacks. And that means there are fewer printing slots (so-to-speak) available for debut authors.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    736
    Quote Originally Posted by Lea Zalas View Post
    Sorry Gary, I need to clarify. According to several well-known agents' blogs, publishers are cutting back on how many books they're publishing each year due to decreasing sales of printed books, especially paperbacks. And that means there are fewer printing slots (so-to-speak) available for debut authors.
    Not necessarily. I have a few established author friends who are being dumped too. Cutting back doesn't mean that new talent is losing its percentage of interest. (Most) agents and publishers aren't dummies about feeding their future bank accounts.

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    6,016
    http://www.scpr.org/programs/patt-mo...lishers-out-of

    This was Patt Morrison's topic yesterday.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Central Virginia
    Posts
    736
    I look for Kindle/CreateSpace to help agents and publishers. It should decrease what they are receiving in submissions, with much of what is going straight to Amazon, Smashwords, etc. being works that wouldn't be selected by an agent or mainstream publisher.

    I don't think the Amazon routes should be thought of as only self-publishing, though. Five selection/royalty-paying publishers I'm working with are using Amazon's modes (A) to catch the e-book market and (B) because CreateSpace is a cheaper route than Lightning Source and a less hassled route than Lulu to go with print on demand on niche books that aren't cost effective to do by print runs. (Even major publishers and Academic presses are now using print on demand for certain types of their backlists.)

  9. #9
    James North
    Guest
    Look at the list of 100 bestsellers for Kindle on Amazon. You will find more self-published books there than New York published. Two of them are mine (under action and adventure). Some of the bestsellers are by writers who have both self-published and New York published books, but many are just self-published writers. The big publishers and agents all see their future growing darker every day.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Rhinebeck, NY
    Posts
    4,623
    AMAZON'S JUNGLE LOGIC (The New York Times)

    ďThe law has long been clear that stores do not invite the public in for all purposes. A retailer is not expected to serve as a warming station for the homeless or a site for band practice. So itís worth wondering whether itís lawful for Amazon to encourage people to enter a store for the purpose of gathering pricing information for Amazon and buying from the Internet giant, rather than the retailer. Lawful or not, itís an example of Amazonís bare-knuckles approach.Ē

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/13/op...0Jungle&st=cse

    *_*

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts