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  1. #21
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    Thank you Leslee,

    I think whenever I attempt to clarify a philosophical distinction, I should probably always preface it with "others have said or as I have been told." I don't want to ever come across I claiming ownership of these ideas.

    Also, about the redundancy. As a school teacher, I have found that redundancy is necessary sometimes for clarity. Often it weakens my writing and I need to go back and cut, but sometimes, especially with these concepts I find it necessary.

    Your thoughts are very helpful, and I thank you.
    Greg



  2. #22
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    JUST MY OPINION, FEEL FREE TO IGNORE:

    Greg, I understand your perspective. However, what works as a school teacher, in a classroom setting, is not necessarily going to work in a book.

    Asking the reader to forgive your redundancy is a mistake. If you write with clairity, and less repetition, you won't have a problem. And if you're repeating yourself to the point of asking the reader to "forgive" you, it's likely they'll just quit reading. It pulls the reader out of the story. Never a good idea.

    Of course, it's your book and you can write it any way you like.

  3. #23
    Senior Member John Oberon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greg winick View Post
    Thought and Awareness
    First, we have to acknowledge that our thoughts are separate from our being. In other words, there was me and there was my mind.
    This is not an easy concept to grasp. If you really think about, there is a duality to your consciousness. You can be aware of a thought that comes into your head as if there was something within you that created the thought and something else in you that is aware of the thought. I was not my thoughts, or as Eckhart Tolle says, “You are not your mind.” My mindmy thoughtswere reflex responses based on past experiences .
    That’s not how I saw it, though. If my mind told me I was supposed to do something, I believed it. Of course, we all have ignored our minds on occasion; anyone who has felt like yelling really loud in a library and didn’t do it will agree. But the mind can be tricky. It can make up things about yourself and tell you to believe them. It wants to protect you. It doesn’t want you to get hurt physically or emotionally. That’s why the guy that got turned down the first time he asked a girl out on a date will forever be apprehensive. Every time he thinks about asking a girl out, he will have to either cave in to his fear of rejection, or ignore those thoughts and ask the girl out anyway.
    The mind will always try to look out for you. It will tell you not to stand up and speak in front of a large group of people because you might say the wrong thing and get embarrassed. The mind is afraid of getting hurt—its job is to protect you—therefore the mind is more cautious than courageous, more pessimistic than optimistic. If you really look into your own mind, you will see that it tends to focus on more negative thoughts than positive ones.
    The mind is also repetitive. It will supply you with more thoughts about a subject or event than necessary. The mind never stops evaluating, judging, trying to solve the problems in your life, and creating stories about every single thing that happens to you. It is a big noise machine in your head that never shuts off. This is provable, because no matter how hard you try, you can almost never stop thinking. You can observe that most of the thoughts in your mind are repetitive and unnecessary.
    #
    This is a difficult concept to distill, so please forgive my redundancy, but often in telling my tale, I will refer to my mind as one thing of me and my “self” or “I” as another. I know this may sound like I am describing a schizophrenic. To a certain degree, I am. Mental illnesses are really just more pronounced versions of what is normal among human beings.
    This duality I am describing exists in everyone. To be absolutely clear, though, when I refer to my mind, I am referring to the mechanism within me that brings forth thoughts, memories, and emotions from my past. My mind also does the job of automatically interpreting everything that happens. These interpretations are what I am calling stories.
    The “I,” or self, is the part of me that has the ability to be aware of my thoughts and interpretations. The “I” has the ability to choose my actions. It’s almost like a part of me is a machine and part of me isn’t.
    Greg, there's not much in your writing that resembles reality. I've never experienced life in the way you seem to think self evident. My mind has always been a part of my being, not separate. I've never had some kind of separate machine-like apparatus that thinks thoughts for me without my control. My mind is not a "big noise machine". I've never been subject to an unrelenting barrage of repetitive and unnecessary thoughts. Not only can I "shut off" conscious thinking for about eight hours every night, but I can stop thinking about one thing and start thinking about another at will during the day. I control what enters my mind and what my mind thinks about.

    You really think "mental illnesses are really just more pronounced versions of what is normal among human beings"? I wonder why they call them "illnesses"?

    If this is your reality, then I can only pity you. I cannot imagine the torment of that reality. I'm glad it isn't mine.

  4. #24
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    Are you saying that you cannot be aware of your thoughts? Isn't part of you doing the thinking and part of you aware of the thinking? Look closely now.

  5. #25
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    I control what enters my mind and what my mind thinks about.
    Really, John?... Everything? All the time? At will?

  6. #26
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    If this is your reality, then I can only pity you. I cannot imagine the torment of that reality. I'm glad it isn't mine.
    At least John-O realizes that nobody perceives his/her reality in quite the same way.

    *_*

  7. #27
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    The only thing I describe as common to all is a duality of consciousness. Everyone perceives there own reality as different, but that perception can cause a lot of suffering especially when horrifying events are taking place in your life. I guess John would not be absorbed with worry if his children were dying. He can control his thoughts, and would easily be able to deal with that situation no matter what occurred. That scenario would not torment him. He pities me because I let that torment me.

  8. #28
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    Bible John is also guilty of the sin of pride.

    *_*

  9. #29
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    If this is your reality, then I can only pity you. I cannot imagine the torment of that reality. I'm glad it isn't mine.

    What colossal arrogance.
    Last edited by leslee; 01-02-2012 at 01:52 PM.

  10. #30
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    Greg, I work in mental health. Trust me, nothing about mentall illness is normal.

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