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  1. #1
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    What's the story with this new crop of e-publishers?

    While I continue to query (unsuccessfully) literary agents, I have begun thinking about other options. I've rejected the idea of self-publishing since I have no promotional skills. I have noticed more and more 'e-publishers' popping up. Many have nice websites and promise reasonable commissions. Here are my questions -

    1. How do you know if these e-publishers are legitimate? Some are so new they haven't gotten into Preditors & Editors yet. If they have, there's very little on them.

    2. If I go this root do I destroy the possibility of ever getting a legitimate agent and a 'real' book deal?



  2. #2
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    Create Space and Lulu are reliable.

    It would be rare for a self-published book to be picked up by traditional publishers, but I've heard it happens. A successful self-published ebook could be attractive to agents and publishers. I don't think it would hurt any chances unless the book itself reflects a style of writing they are not interested in using.

  3. #3
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    Never mind.
    Last edited by Jena Grace; 08-13-2011 at 07:02 AM. Reason: bad me

  4. #4
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    There are quite a few e-publishers. I came across
    I submitted a synopsis two weeks ago in which they replied within 24 hours thanking me for the manuscript and told me they would consider it. I had another reply yesterday from them asking to see my full manuscript.
    They seem very honest and think appreciate how hard it is to find a traditional publisher. Fingers crossed!

  5. #5
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    J.T. I would still try to do research on each, even if they haven't shown up on P&E. Yet. Google is a wonderful resource, you might catch something mentioned in a writer's blog, or just a small comment that would supply some type of information. However, you say that you don't want to do self publishing because you have no promotional skills. A lot of these companies, especially if they are just starting up, probably don't have the money to do a ton of promotional work for you. Similar to many small presses, it will achieve your goal of getting your book out there, but it's going to be up to you to make readers aware that it's out there.

  6. #6
    Remember, a publishing contract is a business deal, so it's all about the due diligence. If you were selling your house, opening a retirement account, hiring a contractor or starting a franchise business, would you work with some random company you'd never heard of?

    Neither would I. A startup publisher might be okay -- if you can verify their track record. But I'd think very carefully before you sign your book rights over to anyone.

    And yes, if you go that route, and your book gets published, then trying to sell it again would mean selling a reprint. Which might be tough.

    My advice? Check out legitimate ebook divisions of established publishers, like Harlequin's Carina Press imprint.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenneth Teicher View Post
    While I continue to query (unsuccessfully) literary agents, I have begun thinking about other options. I've rejected the idea of self-publishing since I have no promotional skills. I have noticed more and more 'e-publishers' popping up. Many have nice websites and promise reasonable commissions. Here are my questions -

    1. How do you know if these e-publishers are legitimate? Some are so new they haven't gotten into Preditors & Editors yet. If they have, there's very little on them.

    2. If I go this root do I destroy the possibility of ever getting a legitimate agent and a 'real' book deal?
    What are you looking for from a publisher? There's very little promotion from e-publishing other than sticking covers around here and there, doing an interview or two on a distributor's site, and getting an on-line review or two for the book (and this only if you're lucky). Beyond that, it's hoping that the on-line browsing gives it synergy--which works much the same as surge for print books always has but does it cheaper and a lot more democratically. (On line, one cover is pretty much equal to any other. At the eye-catching level, the relative fame of the author or reputation of the publishing house recede into the background).

    It's true that e-publishing is so new that there isn't much of a track record for it--but it's a lot easier to do cheaper and without mucking things up than traditional publishing was--and, for the author, there's as much, or more, per-unit profit to be had.

    You can determine with some research browsing major e-book distribution sites (ARE, Fictionwise, Smashwords, Bookstrand, Kindle, B&N, etc.) which e-publishers are selling well in the genre you are writing in. And you can tell for yourself how professional their covers look. The cover is quite important in e-booking. Much more so than the prestige of the publisher. (Readers focus on the cover; few care who published it.)

    I'm not sure I'd spend time going after the e-book arms of established print publishers. Thus far they are mainly putting their existing print offerings into e-books--not looking for new e-book authors.

    On your second question, I don't think having published in the e-book market negates publishing in the print market with A DIFFERENT BOOK. The beginnings of name recognition in the e-book market can help moving to the print market. M.J. Rose did it from self-publishing to print and Amanda Hocking is doing it from e-booking to print. I wouldn't expend much effort trying to move an already e-published title to print, though. But that would be true in trying to find a new publisher for anything already published. Unless there was a hook to the situation, the publisher will be looking at the previous sales the publisher can't make.

    Although electronic publishing has been hyped for years, the real wave of it is here now. It's not coming; it's here. At some point it will be too late to get on the wave--as with any trend in publishing--but it's lucrative and finding readers/buyers at least for now. And it's a lot easier/faster/profitable getting something out in e-book than in print--especially if you are holding out for a traditional, royalty-paying print publisher--and the market of e-booking is beginning to swamp that of print books. On-line distributors are increasing; brick and mortar bookstores are folding.

    I publish e-books under various pen names (e.g., Olivia Stowe). They are selling better than any print books I've ever had--and with less hassle. They had fewer parameters in writing them (e-booking has saved the novella) and I spend more time writing and less time looking for someone to publish them. I don't invest anything in the production of these any more than I would with the traditional royalty-patying print publisher. I got in on the beginning of some e-publishers I knew personally. So I don't have the "who do I trust?" issues that others legitimately have to worry about (but they have to worry about this with print publishers too).

    You'll always have "who do I trust?" questions with publishers of any ilk. The potential self-damage is less, though, I think, with e-publishing than print. There's far less upfront costs and expertise needed for anyone involved in e-publishing than in print publishing.

  8. #8
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    Why not break into E-Publishing slowly by submitting and selling a short story or two free on my site -

    http://www.whiffyskunk.com/home

    Please foillow the instructions in the forum from the home page at http://www.whiffyskunk.com

    3 billion people out there with mobile devices that can download pdf short stories. We take no cut for short stories at all - anything you make you keep and you get paid automatically into your paypal from the buyer.

    We also publish ebooks - isbn's - distribution and authors get 50% of the sales price but this is on hold for the moment until i finish my law course.

    Regards
    Jules
    Last edited by jules jules; 09-19-2011 at 01:15 PM.

  9. #9
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    Even if I were foolish enough to go with an unknown like you, one look at the name of your domain would be enough to drive me away. And, seeing you spam every single thread you can find with this blatant self-promotion tells me that you haven't the slightest clue how to market your idea. Do yourself a favor and learn something about how adults go about this because what you're doing now is only going to come back and haunt you.

  10. #10
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    This isn't the first overkill visit by the skunk if I remember correctly.

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