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Thread: Angela's Ashes

  1. #1
    Senior Member Cheryl Morton's Avatar
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    Angela's Ashes

    Has anyone else read this memoir? This was a best selling novel and won a pulitzer prize. I don't know if I'm mad at the book or mad at myself, but I am really frustrated with trying to read it. I don't get it. The writing seems terrible, and I can't even begin to connect to the story. I've started reading it three times now and I've only made it to page 19. I fall asleep with every few pages I read.

    Has anyone here read this book and liked it? Maybe you could help me figure out what the hell I'm missing, because it sure ain't clicking.

    Thanks,

    Cheryl



  2. #2
    Senior Member C Bets's Avatar
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    Yes, I read it and loved it. But, I must say, it was extremely depressing and sometimes very disturbing. I kept waiting for the happy ending, which never did come.

    I've had the dilemma a couple times myself, and I chalked it up to a personal preference thing. Reading Lolita in Tehran is a good example. Got rave reviews and I STRUGGLED to get even 1/3 the way through that book before I gave up.

    C

  3. #3
    Belinda T.
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    I read it and immediately realized his miserable childhood was one in which forgiveness was sought and it came following years of agonizing emotional turmoil. I connected with it because the dynamics of his dysfunctional family are very asimilar mine.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Cheryl Morton's Avatar
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    I don't mind depressing, disturbing, or sad endings. It's not the content that is problematic. I think the story sounds interesting; it's the writing that is putting me off. I'm reading it to try to understand how a well-written memoir is crafted, but I'm failing to see it. The author switches back and forth between tenses, perhaps as flashbacks, but doesn't make it clear who he's talking about so I get lost, making it very difficult to connect to the characters. He also uses no punctuation, no quotation marks, in his dialogue, so I find myself rereading portions because I didn't realize it was dialogue at first. I'm thinking, 'Is this some kind of unconventional writing technique? How did that make it past the editor?' Maybe it is just a personal preference thing. I don't know.

    Cheryl

  5. #5
    Belinda T.
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    He's mastered the omni pov. Many don't like his unorthodox writing style...but that's why Angela's Ashes warranted the Pulitzer Prize.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Kyle Anderson's Avatar
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    I haven't read Angela's Ashes, but I felt the same about the Dave Pelzer books. I could not get into them.

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