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  1. #1
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    Where of the future bestsellers?

    So what's the deal about eBooks; you read them on a screen, right? Well, yeah, but let's not ignore that eBooks are a revolution. The biggest aspect of it is they've taken away the power of publishers. Writers can have it now. Publishers have made their own beds by sinking all their marketing into a handful of bestselling authors, ignoring all the rest without a thought for development. They've clear cut the forest and haven't replanted. When this lucrative well of authors runs dry, where will they find the new bestsellers? The large majority of bestseller authors have endured many, many rejections - Frank Baum, Dr. Seuss, Beatrix Potter (she had to self-publish)- but they persisted, paid their dues. These writers were willing to wait.

    Society these days tends to be much more impatient. Thanks to electronics we have instant access to many things and communication is blazing fast. Authors today aren't likely to suffer many rejections. They will run to the eBook providers, their shadows never appearing at the publisher's door. The fight will be on.



  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by E.R. Yatscoff View Post
    So what's the deal about eBooks; you read them on a screen, right? Well, yeah, but let's not ignore that eBooks are a revolution. The biggest aspect of it is they've taken away the power of publishers. Writers can have it now. Publishers have made their own beds by sinking all their marketing into a handful of bestselling authors, ignoring all the rest without a thought for development. They've clear cut the forest and haven't replanted. When this lucrative well of authors runs dry, where will they find the new bestsellers? The large majority of bestseller authors have endured many, many rejections - Frank Baum, Dr. Seuss, Beatrix Potter (she had to self-publish)- but they persisted, paid their dues. These writers were willing to wait.

    Society these days tends to be much more impatient. Thanks to electronics we have instant access to many things and communication is blazing fast. Authors today aren't likely to suffer many rejections. They will run to the eBook providers, their shadows never appearing at the publisher's door. The fight will be on.
    You make it sound as if anyone who writes a novel can be e-pubbed. Well-known and respected e-publishers are as picky about their products as traditional print publishers. They don't publish just anything. However, there are a huge, HUGE number of e-publishers out there that don't vet their manuscripts, do no marketing, provide little or no editing (or charge the author for it as well), and, in general, put out an awful lot of poorly-written crap that nobody will ever read. FWIW, there are also print publishers that do exactly the same thing.
    Last edited by Jena Grace; 06-16-2011 at 10:46 PM. Reason: It's almost 2 a.m. and I'm tired.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Avonne Writer's Avatar
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    Plus, I read that right now, authors are getting screwed on the epub side of things. They're getting a really small cut of the profit.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Frank Baron's Avatar
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    Some people have watched Field of Dreams too darn many times and think: if they write it -- readers will come out of thin air to buy.

    Yes, Joe Anywriter can get his opus printed (or digitized) and cut out the publisher. But Joe also cuts out the editors, the art department, the marketing nabobs, the catalogue, the sales force etc.

    Getting printed these days is easy. Getting strangers to pay money to read the results is darn tricky.

  5. #5
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    Well said, Frank. And thanks for taking time out from the soccer riots to comment.

    (just kidding! honest!)

  6. #6
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    "Getting strangers to pay money to read the results is darn tricky."

    Especially when the strangers themselves are busy cranking out their own tomes.

    *_*

    (Re jayce's comment: Yeah, what's with you Canadian hooligans?)

  7. #7
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    Actually, Frank, if you can edit a book well enough that agents won't reject it because it looks amateurish, you should be able to get it into good enough shape to put up on Amazon as a self-published ebook. And, it's beginning to look like there are millions of people out there who will buy ebooks on impulse if the price is right. Judging from what I've seen, $2.99 is probably the sweet spot: high enough to get 70% royalties but not high enough to slow down the impulse buyers.

    I've mentioned before that the daughter of one of my author friends self-pubbed her book and it's selling like hotcakes. From what he's been saying recently, he's planning on putting as much of his back list out as ebooks as he can manage because he can always use the extra income and his legacy publishers aren't doing anything with them. And, of course, the most wonderful thing about ebooks is that they never go out of print because virtual shelf-space isn't a scarce resource.

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