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Thread: Rejection

  1. #1
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    Rejection

    Ok, so the publishing house that I sent out my story to passed on it. But they did tell me the bits that I should have expanded on and what to fix. So I don't see it as a bad thing. I see it as a way to fix my story and make it better. Oddly enough, I am not upset at all. When I make the changes, would it be stupid to send the new version back to that same publishing house? Or should I just send the new version to another publisher, since the first publisher passed on the first version?
    “Put it before them briefly so they will read it, clearly so they will appreciate it, picturesquely so they will remember it and, above all, accurately so they will be guided by its light.”
    -Joseph Pulitzer



  2. #2
    Senior Member Avonne Writer's Avatar
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    Margaret, great that you got advice. I know on the subject of resubmitting, agents have specific guidelines. Some never want to see that piece again. Others will look at it after a few months if you have made substantial changes, etc. I would think that publishers vary just as agents do. Check their guidelines.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Avonne. I will definetely do that.
    “Put it before them briefly so they will read it, clearly so they will appreciate it, picturesquely so they will remember it and, above all, accurately so they will be guided by its light.”
    -Joseph Pulitzer

  4. #4
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    Since you received a personal response, you could contact the person who wrote to you and ask them if they would like to see the new version. But don't just send it without inquiring first.

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    Agree with Leslee.

  6. #6
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    So, Margaret, what's happening with The Old Lady Diaries? You posted some bits from it back in February.

    Notice how I ask you about it every once in a while?

    *_*

  7. #7
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    Thank you Leslee.

    Kitty,
    Glad you still remembered that bit. I have it on the back burner right now. I am finishing up one of my YA novels. I'm still not sure if I will try to publish The Old Lady Diaries. I am writing it more for theraputic purposes. But a part of me still wants to try publishig it when it is finished. We will see.
    “Put it before them briefly so they will read it, clearly so they will appreciate it, picturesquely so they will remember it and, above all, accurately so they will be guided by its light.”
    -Joseph Pulitzer

  8. #8
    Debbi Voisey
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    Margaret,

    Are you pitchng to publishers without an agent? Just curious, since you didn't mention an agent in your post. It has been drummed into me on here that this is not wise, and was just wondering if it is the case with you, what made you go that route. Did you have no luck finging an agent?

    And just to throw this out there to anyone reading this thread. Just say, for arguments sake, that you exhausted all the agents in the Writers and Artists Yearbook whose listing were suitable for your book? Would it be the done thing then to just submit to agents, and maybe approach agents after if you got a bite and say: "Lookie, this publisher wants my book. Wanna represent me?"

    Of course, it would be worded better than that.

    leslee, any thoughts?

  9. #9
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    There is nothing wrong with pitching directly to publishers as long as you know in advance that they accept unagented manuscripts. Do the homework before you query them.

    However, if you are lucky enough to get an offer, have a contract lawyer look at your contract before you sign it. Don't kid yourself that you'll know what's missing. You won't. Also, if you still want an agent, you can contact agents at that point and say, "I have an offer. Will you represent me?" You want a professional to read that contract and spot the flaws, negotiate for anything additional, etc.

    Some successful writers never have an agent. Nothing wrong with that.
    Last edited by leslee; 06-28-2011 at 08:29 AM.

  10. #10
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    The thing about pitching to a bunch of publishers first: what happens if you decide to get an agent, but you've already pitched the ms to--and were already rejected by--all the best publishers on your list?

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