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  1. #1
    Junior Member
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    May 2011
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    Writing a novel, but I can't finish it

    Hi, I am trying to write a novel about two people meeting because one texted the other accidentally by the wrong number and they also meet online, but they have no clue who the other one is. The two main characters are Cassie, a teacher who is new to town to escape bad feelings from a previous relationship, and Sean, a former failed pro hockey player who has a past of fighting, cussing out reporters and teammates, and alcoholism who returns to the same town (which is his hometown) that Cassie is now living in. I have a few ideas about the story. I know how to start it and how to end it, but it's the middle I struggle with . I know if I can get a grasp on the middle, this can be a good story. Any suggestions.



  2. #2
    Dexter Ambrose
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    My advice would be just go with it. Don't agonize over what will happen next. Let it flow. At least that always works for me.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Keith .'s Avatar
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    Ideas are a dime a dozen. So are stories. Writers write. Cut loose and have some fun writing a first draft. Then the real work begins. Luck.
    ________________________________________________

    People seldom do what they believe in. They do what is convenient, then repent.
    - Bob Dylan

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    Aug 2010
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    Write the scenes out of order. If you know the beginning and ending, write those first. Then add something after the beginning, asking yourself, What happens next? You can add material to the section before the ending by asking, How did they get here? Eventually, the middle will work itself out. If you have other scenes already worked out, write those. You can decide later exactly where they should go.

    Jeanne

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Start writing at the beginning and give yourself a daily word-count quota. Make it reasonable, but not too low. (Something like 1,500 to 2,000 words per day will be fine.) Don't worry about quality, worry about quantity at this point. By the time you've got the story set up, you'll have gotten to know your characters, at least a little, and you'll have at least a few secondary characters to work with as well. If you can keep this up, day in and day out for a month or so, you'll have 50,000 or more words of a first draft written, and you might even have reached the end. Yes, I know that that's a tad short today for a novel, but remember: this is only a first draft. (This, btw, is how NaNoWriMo works.) Once you've finished your first draft, your work begins: editing, re-writing and re-re-writing until it's as good as you can get it. It sounds like a formidable job, I know; and it is. However, if you persist, you'll end up with a finished novel that you can be proud of.

    One other thing: don't ignore any plot-ninjas that pop up. (If you're writing a tightly-plotted courtroom drama and six ninjas want to come into the courtroom and sit down, let them; you'll probably find a use for them before you're done.) If nothing else, plot-ninjas are subplots waiting to be used and subplots raise your word count.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    19
    I love this site, just great advice...Joy, as I read about your characters something struck me, I live in a small town that produced a pro hockey player. His name is revered, of course, a street named after him, golf tournaments, etc...what about exploring his reaction to that kind of attention. Maybe he is ashamed of his bad behaviour or maybe the town is rethinking their position regarding his legacy...could be a way to fill a chapter or two.

  7. #7
    Sounds to me like there might not be enough obstacles keeping these characters from getting together (or keeping them from achieving whatever else they want). If you're interested, I've written an article on how to brainstorm plot ideas here:

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    Aug 2010
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    Why not, as long as it doesn't take your readers too far away from your main story. Find some way to tie it in, then make it work.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    4
    What is the website? I cannot see it on here.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    That is interesting that you say that you live in a town that produced a pro hockey player. The person I am basing him on in my story isn't actually a hockey player. I was just trying to change some things around so it wouldn't be as obvious. The route I wanted to go was that he does feel bad about his behavior is trying to change, but the town does not exactly revere him. Some do, but some think he is a hasbeen. It is a little hard to explain...

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