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  1. #21
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    One of the things I do every morning as I sip my first cup of coffee is read blogs by industry professionals to stay on top of the latest news and information. Here are some you might find interesting: Steve Laube, Novel Journey, Rachelle Gardner, Michael Hyatt, and Randy Ingermanson. I recommend limiting the amount of time spent reading these blogs since it's easy to do nonproductive "writerly" stuff and avoid the actual writing.



  2. #22
    Senior Member Diane Theron's Avatar
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    Hi Debbie.. thanks for participating here!

    One of my questions is do you edit your own work before submitting it or do you have it edited beforehand?

  3. #23
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    Hi Diane. I do both, depending on the project and how much time I have.

    I always edit my work as I go. Before I start writing each day, I edit and revise the previous day's work. Then after I finish writing the book, I read it all the way through and put it aside. At least a week later, after I'm not so close to the work, I go through and revise again. If I have time, I have someone else read it before I send it to my editor. I've actually paid editors twice, but even then, the editors at the publishing houses want more revisions.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Zoe Saadia's Avatar
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    Hi, Debby. Thank you so much for all the advice.
    As I'm thinking of something to ask, I just want to let you know how enlightening and informative this thread was for me so far. Thank you!

  5. #25
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    Hi Zoe! You can ask me anything.

    What do you write?

  6. #26
    Senior Member Diane Theron's Avatar
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    Question for Tamela please? Under what circumstances would you consider representing an unpublished writer? And in your industry, how do you differentiate between good and mediocre agents?
    Last edited by Diane Theron; 06-13-2011 at 12:48 PM.

  7. #27
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    Diane, Tamela asked me to post a link to the ACFW page that shows what she's looking for in a prospective client: ACFW agents. Scroll down to her bio and blurb. When Tamela considers taking on unpublished writers, she makes her decision based on how well she knows the market they're targeting, the skills of the writer, and how good the writer is to work with. I've heard her mention looking for a spark in the writing.

    A good agent knows the market and helps his/her clients build their careers based on the goals they've established. Some authors want to sell a book every now and then, while some of us want a steady stream of contracts. The client needs to be up front on what they want and need during the interview with the agent. (My opinion: A mediocre agent isn't likely to last long in this extremely competitive business.)

  8. #28
    Senior Member Avonne Writer's Avatar
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    Debby, thank you for your in-depth response. I have researched "questions to ask potential agent" but most sites list fifty or so different things you can discuss. (A little overwhelming) Thanks for limiting it to a few and thanks for the other links as well. I was just dropping in. If I think of anything else, I write it later.

    Thanks again for your time

    @Victoria- Thanks to you as well for organizing this. Well done.

  9. #29
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    One of the most important professional relationships you can have is with your agent. It's almost like a marriage. When I signed with Tamela, I knew she understood that my goal was to make a living writing books. We worked toward that, and now we're there. I do other things because I want to, but I don't have to. A good agent (and Tamela is for me) is the most valuable asset you can have in your writing career. Before you sign with an agent, make sure you're on the same page.

  10. #30
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    Hi, Debby, and welcome to WN. I have a different question for you that concerns novels that are what I call "Christian-hybrids," a category I fear my book may fall into. I've been querying a book that is literary in style but is set in first century Palestine. Jesus is a peripheral character in the story, more of a catalyst for the events in my MC's life. It's a story that could best be described as Crime and Punishment in first century Palestine.

    One of the agents you mentioned earlier, RG, was kind enough to read and critique my first ten pages and query letter. She told me that, unless the Christian theme is overt, I would be better off querying this book as literary or commercial fiction. She said that most Christian fiction today is slanted toward inspirational romance.

    Is that your experience, since you write and publish Christian fiction? I've queried agents who rep Christian fiction and those who don't. Some of the non-Christian agents have commented that they didn't represent "religious fiction." My guess is that they assume the book is religious because Jesus is a character in the story. And yet, Christian agents say it's not really Christian fiction--at least not in today's market.

    Your thoughts? Recommendations? Is there a literary Christian market out there? Any ideas on how to pitch a book as literary fiction that may be suffering from prejudice because of the "Jesus factor"?

    I don't know if you've read it, but my book would probably appeal to readers who liked Jim Crace's Quarantine.

    Thanks in advance.

    Jeanne

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