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Thread: Black holes

  1. #1
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    Black holes

    Hello. I read an article about black holes yesterday, and it said that if you entered a black hole and you were rotating the same direction as the black hole you would go back in time but if you entered rotating the opposite direction you would go forward in time. So, I was wondering what would happen if you entered it without rotating, and whether that could be used in writing. I don't know. Any opinions?



  2. #2
    Junior Member M.J.S.L.'s Avatar
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    Maybe you fall through into an entirely different world, rather than forward or back in time?

    I don't see why you couldn't use it in writing. Sounds interesting.

  3. #3
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    Well with writing sci-fi you can use any idea you want as long as you can make it believable with enough scientific mumbo jumbo.

    I'm not sure who wrote the article you read, but as far as I've always known (and I have a mild interest in theoretical physics having read a few books about it), its impossible to fall into a black hole. The 1st reason being that the gravitational forces within the event horizon of a black hole are incredibly intense and would tear anything apart before compressing it into the singularity at the centre, not even light can escape (hence the term black hole).
    Secondly, time dilation occurs as you approach the black hole, meaning time slows down the closer you get, eventually time would be going so slow you'd never actually reach the singularity.

    This is of course all theoretical, but means that the its highly unlikely that the article you read is correct. But as i said at the start its Sci-fi, you can make the rules, just make it believable, most people arent going to know enough physics to argue against whats possible or not anyway.

    Anyway hope that helps

  4. #4
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    My first attempt at a book mentions how a planet enters a black hole and what happens afterwards , the good news is that it's science fiction and you allowed to abstract anything you wish to !

    When i think of some of the movies i have seen that have used time travel to manipulate a storyline, i don't see any problems in using a black hole as a premise for a story line

    .......just start writing see where you end up ?

    good luck !
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  5. #5
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    Rod, if you're hoping that people who buy your first book will be interested in your second, you'd better get your science straight. I can assure you that most SF fans (or fen as we often call ourselves [one fan, two or more fen]) do try to keep up with the science involved and expect the writers to do the same. Treating your audience with that type of contempt (And that's what it is, you, know, thinking so little of your readers that you don't even try to get it right.) is an excellent way to chase them away. HTH, HAND.

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    Hi Allison!

    A thread I'm actually qualified to help with! I'm not sure what you were reading, but please don't take it as fact! The main problem with black "holes" is that they're not holes at all. They're a tiny clump of neutrons which are behaving in a very strange way.

    The interesting things you're talking about - like going backwards in time - are based on some neat math which "implies" that it is "possible" that another universe exists where time runs backwards. That's just math, though, and stems from our need to draw straight, intersecting lines, creating a universe on either side (mathematically). The only possible link between these universes occurs at singularities (black holes). There is no "path", though. It's just a little ball of neutrons. A planet can't "go through" one, it can merely get ripped up, spun around, and flattened against it.

    In an interesting aside - I well recall a general relativity lecture at university where the professor turned to us after drawing a space-time graph, and remarked "Well, you'll notice I've created a universe on the left hand side of the board."

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    Ok, thanks. I haven't actually studied any of this, I was just wondering about the possiblity. I find the possible applications of energy fascinating. By the way, what happens to the stuff that is sucked into a black hole after it is ripped apart? Does the energy that made up its atoms just increase the black hole's energy/gravity?

  8. #8
    James North
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    If the Earth were a black hole, it would be about 3/8 of an inch in diameter. Do you think anyone could live through being squeezed that much? But long before then, if you got close to the event horizon (feet or head first) you would be spaghettized, stretched long and thin. There is no way to live over being anywhere near a black hole.

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    Actually, Emily, the singularity does not consist of neutrons because it's a point mass: it has zero volume and even neutrons can't exist there. I know, because I've discussed this with people who's job it is to know, such as a physics professor at the University of Illinois. He also told me that anything that crosses the event horizon reaches the singularity within milliseconds at most; orbiting the singularity inside the black hole simply isn't possible.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Diane Theron's Avatar
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    @ Emily - I didn't know that you were so knowledgable in this stuff! Hint.. maybe time to post some of your work again!

    @ Rod - SF fans can be very critical - and although he said it in a rather harsh way, Joe is right. SF readers are in the know of the standards and if you let them down on error's won't pick up another book of yours again. I discovered this at a very lively dinner debate last week. The only time that you can really get away with just making it up as you go is with magic. And even then, lovely Harry Potter and friends have set up a certain standard. What is life coming to when even kids hold you to a standard!

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