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  1. #31
    Senior Member Zoe Saadia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satyrical Raven View Post
    ...
    What did throw me was this:
    Torn by his love for Neokė I did not notice anywhere that Neokė is mentioned prior or explained. Is that the name of his wife? because the spelling/names are so unusual, it could also be a place. I don't think so, it reads like 'wife' but it did stop me.
    Perhaps:
    Torn by his love for his wife Neokė

    I do love the name Neokė though, sounds so cool. If this book comes out, bet you any money people will start naming their little girls Neokė!
    Thank you, Raven
    Neokė is not his wife (the wife is long forgotten along with the dumped Cahokia). Neokė is the "beautiful Iroquoian woman" mentioned in the sentence avobe in QL.
    But if you say it's not clear, than I will rewrite it. Thank you!

    I love this name too lol.
    It just a word in Seneca's language (the story is happening among them). I didn't use any Iroquoian name. As Allott mentioned, I didn't want to offend anyone by using some ancient names, which are the property of the clans anyway.
    So I just took some nice sounding words and used them to name the PRO's. Neokė means Deer, but it has nothing to do with the story. I just fell in love with the sound of this word.
    I'm really glad you liked it too!

    (Btw, I got your email but couldn't give it a serious attention because of the weekend. I'll work with it today)
    Last edited by Zoe Saadia; 05-01-2011 at 12:45 AM.



  2. #32
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    Zoe,

    You wrote, "....nothing is certain."

    I think, perhaps that's the fascination with history. We're always reinventing it according to the needs of our times, or the perceived needs. My guess is that writers working on historical fiction right now are at a cusp of shifting needs when it comes to interpreting history, or pre-history. For the last few decades, we've had a need to interpret pre-historic North American natives along the lines of Russo's noble savage, and I suspect this has been driven by white guilt, and rightly so. But I think both native and non-natives are needing something past guilt-based narrative in recent years and our literature has reflected a shaky sort of fault line. Those of us writing now are straddling that fault line. It's a fascinating time to be writing historical fiction, but also wrought with temptation to play both sides rather than straddle.

    I had five times as many members of the native group I wrote about come up to me at readings and events and say something like, "You got us right. Don't let those fools (other members of the native group) give you ****," as I got **** from those members of the native group. It wasn't until I processed the feedback from readers after my tour and reviews and so forth, that I contemplated how similar my needs to reach into and reinterpret history as a white girl spending time among the remote vestiges of a native group, was to the needs of those natives themselves to reinterpret -- that they were sick of the noble-savage wall between us. We were both spanning a new interpretation from opposite sides.

    Don't know my point, just that I find the subject fascinating.

  3. #33
    Senior Member Zoe Saadia's Avatar
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    I think I do understand your point, and, anyway, I love the way you analyze issues and ideas (not only through our discussion)

    The problem with people who has nothing to do with history (which is their rightful privilege, of course) is that many assume that history is among the exact sciences, clear and defined.
    They would be always surprised and resentful to read/hear something that contradicts the knowledge they've brought out of school/home. After all they were taught so and so, so it has to be true.
    When the basic foundation of most, however well known, historical event is that it might have happened differently; that it not necessarily happened this way or for that reason; that it all depends on so many factors, beginning with the one who put the story down on paper/papyrus/wall, proceeding through numerous people, who have translated and interpreted it, and ending with the personal interpretation of the one who is teaching it. Too many channels to my liking lol.
    Last year here (in Israel) came out a well written and amazingly well researched historical novel that turned the whole Old Testament upside down (king David times) . I loved every word of this novel! Aside of being greatly researched, I loved the logical conclusions of the author (much more logical than it goes in the bible, for my taste).
    Mah, what an uproar it made! Of course, the religious people wouldn't touch it for a world. But it's ok, I can understand them.
    But the rest! After all, the bulk of the country is a non-religious folk. No matter who you would talk to, they would shrug uncomfortably and say "Yeah, well, but it wasn't like that after all." Like they would know how it was, a few thousands years later with a whole bunch of messed up, poorly written accounts, that has accidentally spread throughout the world and been interpreted by many generations of people with agenda. LOL, I mean argggggggghhhhhh. Why do people think history is like math??!!!
    And again, I'm not talking about religious people. They believe in god and it's their right. But those who look on the bible as an historical document, can't they see that it's nothing more than an another document that can't be taken as an accurate account more that any other document?
    I remember spending time on AncientVines, how we would have at each other on the Roman section, those for Caesar and those who were against him, each knowing he/she is right, each relying on his/her own bunch of well researched and well studied sources. But ask average person who this Caesar was and he/she will tell you what he/she was taught at school and will get offended if you claim this not necessarily what has occurred. No way! They were taught this what happened and that's it.

    Wow, did I get carried away? lol
    And I even didn't get to the North America yet

    (I think I would better PM you )

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