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  1. #71
    CASS
    Guest

    Re: wrong business?

    The templates thing never works. People always want custom-designed. I'd offer both options, if I were you.

    I did this for charities one time (MJ Rose actually wrote a story about me on Wired).



  2. #72
    Scott Saylors
    Guest

    Re: wrong business?

    It seems to me that something "burning in their soul" is a poor basis for a career.

    Those who want to write as a career have to have a certain amount of fire in their belly for the process.

    But angst doesn't sell books any better than vanity publishers do.

    Angst often gets in the way of a writer, rather than help him.

    The angst-ridden author usually doesn't write much once they get the angst wrung out of their soul. They tend to be one shot wonders. Sometimes that one-shot is a literary milestone, but only in the same proportion that vanity publishing translates into worthwhile sales.

    Regards,
    Scott

  3. #73
    Scott Saylors
    Guest

    Re: wrong business?

    Getting books to market properly takes time. Not only does the book have to be edited, provided with cover art, and printed. It also has to be printed as Advance Review Copies (ARC's) before it goes to the major print run to be sent to reviewers, book stores, etc. to obtain book blurbs and reviews to include in the first print edition for sale. Six months after the book is typeset and issued as ARC's is pretty mandatory.

    As to staff salaries, that's not part of the per book budget. It's part of the regular cost of doing business, but doesn't affect the marketing budget of a particular book.

    Marketing budgets are not a cross-the-board amount, they are computed book by book based on what the publisher thinks they'll get in return. Big selling authors get the lion's share, of course.

    The rest often goes out in terms of special marketing reductions to the bookseller's per item cost.

    An $8 paperback is normally sold to the bookstores at 40% discount, then the publisher offers a small further reduction in return for the bookstore spending a little more to market a particular book--like putting it on a table or rack at the front of the store in the window, putting posters and copies near the register, even shelving it cover out for a period of time, etc.

    Regards,
    Scott

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