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  1. #1
    Kyle Ticali
    Guest

    A couple of questions

    I have a couple of questions regarding the editing/writing process. 1) When you've finished a manuscript, how long do you wait before you edit it? 2) When you do get around to editing said manuscript, are you also writing another project simultaneously? Or do you rotate from writing, to editing, and back again.

    It took me about a year before I found the energy to edit my first novel, and since then (a couple of weeks ago) work on my second novel has all but ceased. I'm just curious how other writer's manage this process.



  2. #2
    Kyle Ticali
    Guest

    Re: A couple of questions

    Pardon the grammatical errors above, if it does yah.

  3. #3
    John Oberon
    Guest

    Re: A couple of questions

    Most writing editing I do as I write. After I finish, I edit the story and just clean up the writing.

  4. #4
    Cindy Kay
    Guest

    Re: A couple of questions

    Kyle, somewhat like John, I don't really separate the two. I'm always ripping apart perviously written scenes or tweaking them, adding, subtracting, rearranging. I get an idea in one scene that then I go back and put into the previous stuff. Editing often, for me, means creating new scenes to fill in gaps or just do something better.

    There is a phase in which I stop and print out the whole thing and banish the family or go off by myself for a weekend and just read it all. I find that there's an imposed waiting period when I give the manuscript out to my first readers, then go through the process of interviewing each for ideas, problems, fixes. Usually a couple weeks. I'm sometimes working on a magazine article at the same time, but in recent years those have been short, easy articles so I just squeeze them in.

    Don't think I could work on another piece of fiction at the same time. I'm often working in a couple places in the manuscript at once, and that's confusing enough.

    The line between writing and revising isn't so distinct now with computers that let us so easily change so much.

  5. #5
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest

    Re: A couple of questions

    I like to wait a few months after the writing to edit it, gives me a fresher take on it. What I did for a few years was build up material in spring/summer and then cozy up in winter to edit.

  6. #6
    Frank Baron
    Guest

    Re: A couple of questions

    I tend to edit as I go, too. If I'm writing for publication, I review the previous day's work before starting on the current day's. Every once in a while, I'll go over the whole thing and usually find a something(s) that need a tweak. When completed (if not on deadline) I'll put it away for a few days before having at it a final time. (Until the editor chimes in with his ideas....)

  7. #7
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    Re: A couple of questions

    No one can edit themselves. What they are doing is reviewing. Editing requires separate eyes (and training on how to do, not incidentally).

    In reviewing, I try to let a short story/essay sit at least overnight before a final review--although I'll usually do one right after finishing it too.

    For a novella/novel, I let it sit longer before a final review.

    Try to come back with some delay so you're taking as fresh a look as possible--but be prepared to miss a lot of things because it's your own work. You'll read right through a lot of mistakes because your mind will still be telling you it reads what your hands didn't actually write. And also, if you make habitual mistakes in the first place, you're not all that likely to see them as mistakes in your review.

  8. #8
    John Hawkwood
    Guest

    Re: A couple of questions

    I edit myself.

    [Note: Edited for clarity, punctuation, brevity, accuracy, elimination of superfluous vulgarity, and the sheer heck of it.]

  9. #9
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    Re: A couple of questions

    No you don't. You think you do, but you don't. (And, if you try, it won't work out very well.)

    Edit is something someone else (with fresh eyes and training) does.

  10. #10
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    Re: A couple of questions

    It's sort of like trying to be your own surgeon or lawyer.

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