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  1. #1
    . Crystalwizard
    Guest

    And. And Then. Then - how, when, and why to use them.

    And. Then. And then. Those three, simple, insignificant parts of speech drive many writers to the nut house, and give editors fits. You'd think something so small wouldnít have such a large effect on people. But they do.

    Hereís a sentence to get you thinking:

    Joe opened the door and walked out into the hall.

    Now what is wrong with that sentence? We speak like that, donít we? Iím going to bet you visualized Joe opening the door. Joe stepping through the doorway. Joe standing in the hall.

    Want to know the rest? Read the full article here:
    bit.ly/8UDpCm

  2. #2
    Kitty Foyle
    Guest

    Re: And. And Then. Then - how, when, and why to use them.

    Your Joe sentence didn't get me thinking, if by thinking you mean puzzling.

    However, I expected it to somehow relate to your comment about "And, Then, And then." And it didn't.

    (Anybody who likes cats and chocolate, though, must have some redeeming qualities.)

    *_*.

  3. #3
    jayce
    Guest

    Re: And. And Then. Then - how, when, and why to use them.

    You're gonna have a whole lotta thens in your narrative.

  4. #4
    Author Pendragin
    Guest

    Re: And. And Then. Then - how, when, and why to use them.

    What's she is saying is that Joe is doing two things at once, opening a door, and at the same time walking into the hallway. Logically, the writer meant to say that Joe performed both of those actions in sequence.

  5. #5
    Kitty Foyle
    Guest

    Re: And. And Then. Then - how, when, and why to use them.

    Ah yes, I see what you mean, AP.

    He (I think of the writer as a he) could have written, "Joe opened the door and then he walked out into the hall." The "then" seems unnecessary to me, but I 'spose he could have. As jayce more or less said, his piece would (then!) be riddled with the little suckers.

    "For dinner I had some rice and beans." Now here, the beans could have been eaten with the rice, or separately all by themselves ("or' is another tricky word). But one usually doesn't wonder about the details when it comes to rice and beans.

    Personally, I'm a casserole kid -- I like a bunch of stuff all thrown together, even on the fork. People who first scarf down their pile of mashed potatoes, and (then!) move on to a slab of something-or-other....those people I don't understand. :-)

    *_*

  6. #6
    Cindy Kay
    Guest

    Re: And. And Then. Then - how, when, and why to use them.

    If it were true, as Wizard suggests, then these two sentences would convey the same action flow for the reader:

    Joe opened the door and walked out into the hall.

    Joe walked out into the hall and opened the door.

    For this reader, they do not convey the same image. In the first example, I see Joe opeing a door that exits onto a hallway. In the second, Joe's in a hallway and finds a door to open.

    The syntax of Engish places emphasis on order (unlike Latin, which I'm attempting to learn), so a whole load of meaning is conveyed by the order in which the actions are written, which makes "then" superflious (sp?).

    It's even true in the math example given in the link. The plus sign in the 2+2 equation is directional (2 and 2 equals four). If it could have gone the other way, if the "and" didn't in fact convey direction, then we'd get 2 +/or/- 2 = ... well it's either 4 or 0. In math, like in most writing, "and" has a forward/positive direction. This is the given state of a sentence that links two improbably simultanious actions by "and." When writing out an equation, we don't have to write, "two and then two equals four." "And" is directional forward. English syntax is based on word order, unlike Latin, in which the direction is given by word endings.

    I think the author of the link Wizard posted understands neither math nor English snytax.

  7. #7
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    Re: And. And Then. Then - how, when, and why to use them.

    I think the sentence as given is just fine. Got to give the reader some credit for understanding proper progression. You'd only need to fiddle with it if there was a reason why it wasn't one continuous movement.

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