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  1. #1
    Don Daffron
    Guest

    Fact check for a scene.

    Fact check for a scene.

    I have a medical question and I canít find the answer on the internet. I have a scene in my story where the MC is wounded and the doctor uses direct transfusion. (He is operating under primitive conditions.) I know someone who has AB positive blood is a universal receiver, but I canít find anything about two or three people with different blood types donating blood to the same AB positive patient. Is mixing donor blood types when given to a ďuniversal receiverĒ okay, or do the last two donorsí blood types have to be the same as the first donorís blood type?

    I have searched the medical sites, but canít find the answer. I thought maybe someone on WN is a nurse or doctor and could answer this question.



  2. #2
    Josh Lemay
    Guest

    Re: Fact check for a scene.

    I'm not a doctor, so I don't know for sure, but it stands to reason that if A blood isn't compatible with B blood, then there should be adverse reactions if they mix.

    Meaning, your AB character could receive both types of blood at different times, but if he got a transfusion, one after another, of A and then B, I don't think they'd mix very well at that current time. If given a chance to combine with the rest of their blood(who knows how long that'd take?), I assume it would work out better.

    This is all speculation on my part. I do have a friend who is a PA and I'll ask her later today to see if I can get a more definitive answer if you haven't gotten one already.

  3. #3
    Jeanne Gassman
    Guest

    Re: Fact check for a scene.

    Don,

    O negative blood types are universal donors. In an emergency, their blood type is compatible with all blood types. My husband is O neg and is at the top of the list when there's a blood shortage. He's also CMV negative, making him a viable donor for preemies (who have impaired immune systems).

    BTW, AB negative is the rarest blood type.

    Jeanne

  4. #4
    Don Daffron
    Guest

    Re: Fact check for a scene.

    Jeanne Gassman:

    Thanks. I found that (0 negative) on the net. I was hoping I wouldnít have to go into the donorís blood type in the scene. I think it unlikely that three friends would just happen to have the same blood type (0 negative or AB positive). The MC having AB positive is not too much of a stretch, but three more people in the circle of friends all having the same blood type would be laughable. This kind of thing would certainly pull the reader out of the story and ruin the reading experience.

    I saw a movie about ten years ago where a patient was given a direct transfusion, and the doctor did not know either the patientís blood type or the donorís. I caught this and Iím not medically trained. Imagine how this kind of mistake would make someone who knows better laugh.

    I want to thank you and a few others (they know who they are) who give so much of your time here on WN answering questions for those like me. The great thing is, it is obvious you do it out of generosity and a love for the craft and not because you like being a big frog in a little pond.

    Thanks again.

  5. #5
    Josh Lemay
    Guest

    Re: Fact check for a scene.

    Ok, I got the answer from a professional, which is contradictory to the answer I said. I'm bad.

    Anyways, the blood transfusion should only depend on the receiver's blood type in your situation. Since AB positive is a universal receiver, your MCs three friends could be whatever, and you wouldn't have to mention it if you didn't want to.

    The rejection of blood for a transfusion depends on the receiver's body, not necessarily their blood type. The blood itself doesn't reject anything, it's the body that checks the blood and then says, "Excuse me, you shouldn't be here," if it's not compatible, and then rejects it.

    So, yes, mixing blood types for a transfusion would be fine as long as the situation you described(AB positive) happened.

    Another possibly interesting fact with transfusions is that many times after receiving multiple transfusions of blood, the receiver may experience fevers, chills, headaches, and/or back pain. This is a fairly common occurrence, and usually goes away on its own(febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction). Fever and chills could also mean severe hemolytic transfusion reaction, though, which is much rarer but shares similar symptoms and is usually caused by non compatible blood(which would be impossible in your scenario).

    Hope that helps.

  6. #6
    Don Daffron
    Guest

    Re: Fact check for a scene.

    Great!
    Thanks to everyone. You went way out of your way to help. I will try to pay it forward on WN if I can.

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