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  1. #1
    Book Werm
    Guest

    awkward plural posessive

    A woman is referring to her husband's three sisters who are a truly vicious group.

    This is the sentence:

    I was no longer nave about my sisters-in-law vicious ways.

    That denotes plural, but not posessive. How would I do that?



  2. #2
    Lily
    Guest

    Re: awkward plural posessive

    I was no longer naive about the vicious ways of my sisters-in-law.

  3. #3
    Laura M
    Guest

    Re: awkward plural posessive

    I believe for possessive, it goes on the "law" part. So it would be "sisters-in-law's".

  4. #4
    Cindy Kay
    Guest

    Re: awkward plural posessive

    However it goes, it's too many "s" sounds.

    "...sisters-in-law and their vicious ways." But I'd look for something other and vicious, to get two "s" sounds out of there.

  5. #5
    Don Daffron
    Guest

    Re: awkward plural posessive

    Vindictive
    Bitchy
    Hateful

    None of the above has an s.

  6. #6
    Josh Lemay
    Guest

    Re: awkward plural posessive

    <http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sister-in-law>

  7. #7
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    Re: awkward plural posessive

    The Chicago Manual of Style prefers rewriting to "the vicious ways of my three sisters-in-law." But if forced not to change, it should be "my three sister-in-laws' vicious ways." (7.25)

  8. #8
    nancy drew
    Guest

    Re: awkward plural posessive

    Can you not identify them (as either sisters-in-law or by name) earlier so you can use a pronoun in the above sentence?

    E.g.: Mabel and Doreen had repeatedly struck me over the head with the knobby end of a tire iron, and Fannie hooted her approval. I was no longer naive to their vicious ways.

    Or: My sisters-in-law had frequently savaged me with their razor-sharp tongues. I was no longer naive to their vicious ways.

  9. #9
    Christopher Morris
    Guest

    Re: awkward plural posessive

    I have a similar problem.

    'Ethan and Cesar's trip' or Ethan's and Cesar's trip'? The two characters embarked together, so does the shared trip make Ethan and Cesar one unit?

  10. #10
    Gary Kessler
    Guest

    Re: awkward plural posessive

    If it's a shared thing (trip or coauthored book, for instance), the possessive only goes on the last element.

    If not shared, it goes on both: Ethan's and Ceasar's trips; Zelda's and F. Scott's deaths.

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