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Thread: Transitions

  1. #1
    Nichole Blackfinch
    Guest

    Transitions

    I'm working to improve the transitions in my manuscript. When my characters move from one scene to another, or from dialogue to action, it sometimes feels clunky. I don't have any real training in fiction writing, so I'd love to hear some tips from the pros here on making these parts flow more smoothly.
    Thanks!



  2. #2
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest

    Re: Transitions

    Usually when you go from one scene to another you put a # between the scenes to indicate a break. Or you could use short chapters.

  3. #3
    sam albion
    Guest

    Re: Transitions


    I'm no "pro", but...

    ...you can add a line break and change scene mid-chapter, just a space, like the one below...>


    or you can have a line break with dashes/dots, etc, like this:

    * * * * *

    it's up to you. However, there are two rules- either the characters need to be the same characters in each section, or the location must be the same in each section. Then there is a natural link between two parts, and the scenes flow better (I think).

    ...if it's a completely different location and contains different characters then personally I think the new section should be a fresh chapter unless the scene is a grand climatic one involving the perspectives of different characters in the same situation.

    Hope that makes sense!

  4. #4
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest

    Re: Transitions


    I'm no "pro", but...

    ...you can add a line break and change scene mid-chapter, just a space, like the one below...>


    or you can have a line break with dashes/dots, etc, like this:

    * * * * *


    Standard formatting is a # to indicate a break, not dashes or dots or fleur-de-lis or any other weird symbols. Unless something has changed recently.

  5. #5
    Janice W-D
    Guest

    Re: Transitions

    Nichole,

    I usually use the above methods for long jumps in time, including flashbacks, or POV switches within a chapter. You can also use time or weather:

    That afternoon, I went for a walk.
    Three days later, Louie surprised me with flowers.
    After I graduated from college, my husband and I moved to Houston.
    My grandmother died three weeks before my wedding.
    It rained all week.
    He called to check on me after the tornado passed on to a town south of here.

    This article may help you:
    <http://www.helium.com/items/1461139-how-to-write-transitions-in-fiction>

    Best,
    Janice

  6. #6
    Nichole Blackfinch
    Guest

    Re: Transitions

    Thank you.

    Janice, that article was helpful for what I needed.

  7. #7
    mar quesa
    Guest

    Re: Transitions

    Nicole,

    The first thing that you need to assess is whether your scenes are well developed. A scene is like a short story: it has a beginning, middle and ending. Some transitions might "feel clunky" when a scene isn't well developed and the scene ending isn't intriguing or obvious. In a case like this, you can write "three weeks later" or put all the asterisks and spaces that you like to mark the transition and it would still "feel clunky".

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