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  1. #1
    Anderson Council
    Guest

    Probably a familiar lament, but . . .

    I have never really heard a particularly helpful answer.
    I would very much like to not concern myself with readers
    (friends, acquaintances) seeing or imagining themselves in my work, and I would like even moreso for people not to see or imagine they see me. How do you handle these concerns?



  2. #2
    John Oberon
    Guest

    Re: Probably a familiar lament, but . . .

    I don't understand what you're so concerned about. Frankly, I like it when readers see themselves or someone they know in my writing. That tells me that they strongly identify with the story. I like it when they see or think they see me in my writing, because that bespeaks a sort of fanship. And why shouldn't they see me in my writing? I wrote it. It would be odd if they DIDN'T see me in my writing.

    Now if you write stories extremely similar to actual events in your own and other people's lives, and people know you well enough to understand that's the basis of your story, and they talk about that, and you don't like it...well, just stop basing your stories on actual events. Or if your story is only coincidental to life events, just inform people of that fact. I don't see the problem.

  3. #3
    Derek Wayne
    Guest

    Re: Probably a familiar lament, but . . .

    I understand what you're saying. I hate it when readers assume that I am a character, or that I think the same way as a character. My family always try to figure out if a character is inspired by somebody.

    This is not the same as "strongly identifying with the story". You don't want people thinking you are a pervert, just because one of your characters is perverted(unless of course you are too).

  4. #4
    John Oberon
    Guest

    Re: Probably a familiar lament, but . . .

    Aaaaah...okay. I guess I never encountered the problem because I don't write perverted things. I wouldn't mind if anyone associated me with one of my characters. I always try to write things that I can read to my children or my wife without hesitation. So I'll just bow out of this thread.

  5. #5
    leslee
    Guest

    Re: Probably a familiar lament, but . . .

    When I was searching for an agent, I had several insist that I must be the protagonist in my book. They went so far as to suggest I stop calling it a novel and call it a memoir, because it would be easier (at that time) to sell. It was frustrating.

  6. #6
    Derek Wayne
    Guest

    Re: Probably a familiar lament, but . . .

    Was your novel about a writer named Meslee?

  7. #7
    leslee
    Guest

    Re: Probably a familiar lament, but . . .

    Ha! No, I went with Keslee.

  8. #8
    Derek Wayne
    Guest

    Re: Probably a familiar lament, but . . .

    "I guess I never encountered the problem because I don't write perverted things. I wouldn't mind if anyone associated me with one of my characters.

    I think any story full of perfect, flawless people would be pretty dull. No antagonists in your stories? No moral dilemmas? I guess there doesn't need to be conflict either...as long as your wife and kids like that all your stories are about you.

  9. #9
    leslee
    Guest

    Re: Probably a familiar lament, but . . .

    I write to shame and humiliate my family. When I can make them long to disown me, I rejoice.

  10. #10
    Derek Wayne
    Guest

    Re: Probably a familiar lament, but . . .

    In every story I've ever written there is an older brother--a whiny thirty-something who wets the bed and lives in his domineering mother's basement. I am constantly reassuring my real brother that any resemblence is purely coincidental.

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