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Thread: Horror and Gore

  1. #1
    Byron Millard
    Guest

    Horror and Gore

    I'm just wondering how anyone feels about the use of gore in horror fiction. I personally don't like to use much because I feel that it robs a certain amount of realism from the story. It definitely has it purposes, which I am certainly guilty of, such as making a scene less horrific and more surreal and it certainly works well for comedy. I love it when a story weaves both realistic and over-the-top gore together and uses them to define different scenarios. Anyhow, just looking for some opinions.



  2. #2
    Keith .
    Guest

    Re: Horror and Gore

    I thought this was a Global Warming post ...

  3. #3
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest

    Re: Horror and Gore

    It probably depends on your audience.

  4. #4
    A.L. Sirois
    Guest

    Re: Horror and Gore

    I think that if a writer relies on excessive violence and/or blood-and-guts in an attempt to scare people, he or she is not a very good writer. The best horror fiction terrifies by implication and suggestion. Otherwise what you have is splatter, and that sucks, IMHO.

    I write horror at times but I try to make sure that any violence I use is an outgrowth of the story's requirements and not gratuitous. Whether or not I succeed is the reader's decision, of course. But I do try.

  5. #5
    Byron Millard
    Guest

    Re: Horror and Gore

    Yes, the sudden rise in temperature is causing the polar bears to explode like ripe tomatoes. And now I can't help but see the image of Al Gore holding a chainsaw.

  6. #6
    Ray Veen
    Guest

    Re: Horror and Gore

    I thought this was a Global Warming post ...

    Funniest thing I've seen all day. Almost makes me want to type 'lol', but I'm against all that kind of new-fangled computery-hooey.

  7. #7
    Joe Zeff
    Guest

    Re: Horror and Gore

    I've said it before and I'll say it again. IMNSHO, if you want to write horror, there are two authors you MUST read: Poe and Lovecraft. Both were masters of the genre, and neither one depended on gore. Where is the gore in The Cask of Amontillado? How much blood do you find in The Mountains of Madness or The Dunwitch Horror? And yet, they're considered classics, masterpieces of horror. Do your job right, and you won't need to show your readers one drop of blood or one speck of gore because they'll know, without the slightest shadow of a doubt, that it is there, right around the corner, just out of sight. And, I might add, they won't want to look because they know what they'd see.

  8. #8
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest

    Re: Horror and Gore

    I don't know, Zeff, you might want to read something written in the last 100 years just to get a feel for the new-fangled style. ;-)

  9. #9
    Stacy Copping
    Guest

    Re: Horror and Gore

    I like gore. The word 'splatter' alone filled my mind with an assortment of images.

  10. #10
    A.L. Sirois
    Guest

    Re: Horror and Gore

    Joe Zeff is right, for my money. The new style is just splatter and goo. Screw that. It's like, the difference between the first HALLOWEEN (John Carpenter's) and al lthe other ones. Carpenter's film has some violence and gore in it, sure -- but overall it is <u>scary</u> and disturbing and all the sequels are for the most part just gory. I want to <u>scare</u> people, not gross them out. I think the obsession with blood in such films (and in splatter wwriting) is symptomatic of deeper fvcked-upedness in our society.

    But who am I to say.

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