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  1. #1
    Gregory White
    Guest

    Writing all MAJOR scenes first?

    does anyone here do this?

    My partner was reading a book on writing fiction (one I didn't already own) and the author advised writing all the major scenes of your novel first. Then, to go back and write all the "between stuff" that fills in the story.

    Comments?

    Gregory

  2. #2
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest

    Re: Writing all MAJOR scenes first?

    I could never do that because after I'd done all the good stuff I wouldn't want to bother going back to do all that "between stuff." Seems like eating your dessert first, but it works for some people I guess.

  3. #3
    Ray Veen
    Guest

    Re: Writing all MAJOR scenes first?

    That's just crazy talk. A recipe for a trainwreck. A one-way ticket to Loserdom. A formula for failure. A glossary for... failure. I might try it.

  4. #4
    larry moses
    Guest

    Re: Writing all MAJOR scenes first?

    Gosh, just this moring I was thinking of doing just what Greg said. When Agents asks for the first fifty pages, the 'between stuff' does not grab them.

  5. #5
    leslee
    Guest

    Re: Writing all MAJOR scenes first?

    Every writer has their own approach. Try it. If it works for you, great.

  6. #6
    the cat came back
    Guest

    Re: Writing all MAJOR scenes first?

    Something happens when I write a rough draft. The ideas flow, and the more I write, the more they flow. Personally, I would hate to get boxed in like that.

    But if it works for you...

  7. #7
    A.L. Sirois
    Guest

    Re: Writing all MAJOR scenes first?

    What's "major"? One's definition of that may change over the course of the book. I've had that happen to me.

    I plow through a draft. It sometimes happens that I embark on a scene that contains elements I haven't yet nailed down. So I just make a note or two, or say "FIX THIS" or whatever, and move on. Later I will come back and work my way through the problem.

    For example: I am writing a series of novels set in ancient Egypt. In the second one, I had a scene set at the coronation of a king. I've read a <u>lot</u> about the time period but no clear descriptions of the actual ceremony have survived. I therefore knew I was going to have to make the damn thing up, based on my understanding of the period and the religious symbology and so on. To do this would slow me down. I knew pretty much everything else about the book. So I wrote the entire rest of the novel and came nack to work on that one scene at my leisure.

    *shrug* Works for me.

  8. #8
    cara k
    Guest

    Re: Writing all MAJOR scenes first?

    I don't write my major scenes first, but I do go back and fill in details with my revision. For example, in my drive for dialogue and action, I don't always take the time to include enough thoughts or descriptions in my first draft, so I go back, once I know my characters better, and add in what I missed the first time around.

    --Cara K

  9. #9
    S Stull
    Guest

    Re: Writing all MAJOR scenes first?

    I had an American teacher in high school who made his class write like that for major in-class essays. But, then again, he was pretty... er... strange. Every morning, seven o'clock sharp, he'd stride energetically into the room, look at us bleary-eyed children, and bellow, "CRAZY ENGLISH!" *Shudder*

    Personally, I balked at having to write like that. (Secretly I'd do it from the beginning--how bad of me!)I'd always ask, How can a piece flow properly when written from the middle? Too difficult for me.

    But if it works.......

    --Lyra

  10. #10
    stevenlabri τΏτ
    Guest

    Re: Writing all MAJOR scenes first?



    I say write all the minor scenes first, then go back and spice it up with major scenes.

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