HomeWritersLiterary AgentsEditorsPublishersResourcesDiscussion
Forum Login | Join the discussion
+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Christian Fletcher
    Guest

    Cockney Rhyming Slang

    Does anyone listen to the boys wiv bo bells in there shell likes or don't no one speak like that no more? In London now everyone speaks with a Jamaican accent!



  2. #2
    Christian Fletcher
    Guest

    Re: Cockney Rhyming Slang

    Would it be right to use it in a short story about London?

  3. #3
    dorian kabana
    Guest

    Re: Cockney Rhyming Slang

    will people immediately associate the slang with the reason you have the character speaking it? if so go with it! if the reader has to guess, or if it's too cliche, i'd say scrap the idea...

  4. #4
    Grandmaster Sik
    Guest

    Re: Cockney Rhyming Slang

    Chris', mate, where're y' from?

    To be honest, the whole Jamaican thing is a farce - it comes from ignorant kids who feel they lack history and social grouping impersonating The Yardies to act cool. I used to work with a bird from the Caribbean and she told me that her parents would go mad if they ever heard her speaking that way: apparently they'd moved to England when she was young to give her a better all-round upbringing - for her to speak like that with frausters would've been like a slap in the face for them!
    Personally, I see no problems in using the vernacular/accent you grew up with, but imposters are always gay, hence the term (queens, see?).

    In London... Cockneys... Nah, mate, you've lost me - they're all out in Essex nowadays - London's all jam rolls.
    Seriously though, think about why you'd be writing dialogue in a certain way, if it'd be understood, and then do the right thing. You may be a Cockney yourself, but that doesn't mean all your mates are, so have characters to fit the ratio accordingly.

  5. #5
    Joe Zeff
    Guest

    Re: Cockney Rhyming Slang

    Please remember, that to be considered a Cockney you must have been born within the sound of Bow Bells. This means, BTW, that the famous conductor Leopold Stokowsky was a Cockney, because he was born in the right part of London while his family was emigrating from Poland to the US.

  6. #6
    the cat came back
    Guest

    Re: Cockney Rhyming Slang

    If you know it...

  7. #7
    Grandmaster Sik
    Guest

    Re: Cockney Rhyming Slang

    <quote=Joe Zeff>"Please remember, that to be considered a Cockney you must have been born within the sound of Bow Bells. This means, BTW, that the famous conductor Leopold Stokowsky was a Cockney, because he was born in the right part of London while his family was emigrating from Poland to the US."</quote>

    Bah humbug!
    Okay, so traditionally it may have been, but nowadays it's a dialect, and as such, has much broader roots.
    Lock, Stock... was a bag of crap with idiots forcing accents and phrases to the point of irritating and appearing as charlatans; please remember this [Christian] and learn from it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts