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Thread: As a reader...

  1. #11
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest

    Re: As a reader...

    Well John you can pull my head out of the gutter, but the rest of me is firmly entrenched there.



  2. #12
    Nikki Smith
    Guest

    Re: As a reader...

    The first time I read of a character 'ejaculating' words, I had a little trouble understanding why someone would choose that particular word.

    I believe its distracting. I also believe that's the point for some writers. Who doesn't look twice when they see the word ejaculate? It pulls you away, but it gets your attention. Does that make sense?

  3. #13
    Anthony Ravenscroft
    Guest

    Re: As a reader...

    Yah, Nikki. That's the problem with about every "said bookism" -- soon enough, everyone's snarling, growling, spitting, squealing... I suppose "ejaculating" isn't terribly out-of-place!

  4. #14
    John Chritton
    Guest

    Re: As a reader...

    @Nancy:

    That's actually a very good thought, and one that I hadn't considered yet. I'll have to think about the possibilities for that inside the confines of the story line.

    @Rogue:

    I lol'd

    @Nikki:

    It's very possible that it's just me. I have to re-read all of the books in a series whenever a new one comes out, because otherwise I don't get as emotionally involved or fully understand the writer's purpose. When an odd word or phrase comes up, it's kind of like I read the book in ten-minute fragments instead of straight through. Make any sense at all?

  5. #15
    Rogue Mutt
    Guest

    Re: As a reader...

    I'm glad that's all you did John.

  6. #16
    stevenlabri τΏτ
    Guest

    Re: As a reader...


    Good thing we meet here in cyberspace and don't have to shake hands.

  7. #17
    Mandy Pauza
    Guest

    Re: As a reader...

    I love learning new words, but I've been called on the carpet by readers who, rightly, felt I'd used an archaic meaning badly when simple English would have conveyed the meaning better.

    Using a word oddly for no reason and with no attempt to pull it into the context (even just for charcter flavor) is just another way patting yourself on the back for your supposedly superior vocabulary.

    Erudite is a dirty word. Yes, I've been guilty, too.

  8. #18
    Anthony Ravenscroft
    Guest

    Re: As a reader...

    Oh, there's times to go entirely over-the-top & really ham things up. I once referred to myself as "hirsute & grizzled," enjoying the fact that not 1 in 10 people have any idea what those words mean.

    But doing it constantly for no good end is simply thesauritis, probably complicated by explosive logorrhea.

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